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1989 


FOREWORD 

This publication contains 156 brief biographical 
sketches of Fort Wayne pioneers and civic leaders who 
are interred in Linden wood Cemetery. They were 
originally published in the Fort Wayne Newspapers and 
later compiled into three booklets issued by the Fort 
Wayne Public Library in 1973, 1976 and 1978. 
Research and writing for these capsule biographies was 
done by Arthur M. Paulison and many of the drawings 
were by Morris R. Perry. 

Funding for this book was provided by the Lindenwood 
Historical Foundation. 

Thomas W. Pehike 
Executive Director 
Lindenwood Historical 
Foundation 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2017 with funding from 
Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center ' 


https://archive.org/details/pioneersrestingiOOpaul_0 



MANAGED OLD 
HEIDEKIN HOUSE 

Calvin Anderson (1803-1897) was one of Fort 
Wayne's well known pioneer businessmen. He 
came here in 1846 from Ohio to lease and manage 
the celebrated Heidekin House which stood on Barr 
St., between Columbia and Main. 

In 1855, Mr. Anderson entered the grocery busi- 
ness which he successfully operated until 1867, 
when he retired. He cast his first vote in 1824 for 
John Quincy Adams for president. Eli G. Anderson, 
a son, for many years managed the Anderson Tea & 
Coffee Co., at Broadway and Jefferson. 

The Andersons were members of the First Presby- 
terian Church* 








BUILT HISTORIC 
AVELINE HOTEL 

Francis S. Aveline (1814-1865) is best remem- 
bered in Fort Wayne's early history for the con- 
struction of the old Aveline Hotel which stood at 
the southeast corner of Calhoun and Berry from 
1863 until 1908. The hotel was destroyed by 
f:re May 3, 1908, in one of the city's worst re- 
corded tragedies. Twelve of 61 guests perished. 

The Aveline in its time sheltered some of the 
Nation's great dignitaries — Blaine, McKinley, 
Bryan, Taggart, Tom Marshall, Beveridge and 
Fairbanks. Aveline came here from Vincennes. 
He, along with Francis Comparet, built the res- 
ervoir now known as Sylvan Lake, Rome City. 



CITY’S MAYOR 
FOR 15 YEARS 

Harry W. Baals (1886-1954) was a native of Fort 
Wayne, and first entered public life in 1922 as post- 
master, serving in that office for nine years. He was 
elected mayor in 1934, and re-elected forthree suc- 
cessive terms. In 1947 he did not stand for re-elec- 
tion but in 1951 emerged from political retirement 
and was elected to his fourth term. 

One of his goals was elevation of the Nickel Plate. 
He turned the first shovel of dirt In the project, but 
did not live to see its fulfullment. He was first em- 
ployed by GE in 1901 , and remained there 21 years. 

He was an ardent Republican and his political 
strength lay in his understanding and respect of 
people. 


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FIRST AMERICAN 
WORLD WAR 1 ACE 

Paul Frank Baer, 37, native of Fort Wayne, who 
rose to become America's first World War I ace, 
lost his life at Shanghai, December 9 ,1930, when 
a mail plane he was flying crashed during take-off. 
His body was brought to Fort Wayne where the 
city accorded him the largest military funeral in 
its history. 

He served first with the French Air Service and 
then with the U.S. 103rd Aero Squadron. Within 
45 days after he began combat flying, he had 
downed 16 German planes, receiving official credit 
for 9. France gave him her Legion of Honor and 
Croix-de-Guerre. He was the first aviator to re- 
ceive the U.S. Distinguished Service Cross. Fort 
Wayne's municipal airport terminal was named for 
him. 



HELD PROMINENT 
POSITIONS HERE 

Judge Peter P. Bailey (1813-1899) came here in 
1842, opened a hardware store at Clinton and 
Columbia and later became president of the 
Merchants National Bank, Fort Wayne Postmaster, 
and president of the Fort Wayne and Cincinnati Rail- 
road. 

He spent sometime in Mississippi and was 
chancellor of a large area of the state, and became a 
judge in Jackson, Miss. He was one of the founders 
of Trinity Episcopal Church here In 1844, and its 
first senior warden. 



PIONEER SCHOOL 
INSTRUCTOR HERE 

Myron F. Barbour, (1811-1900) native of Sheldon, 
N.Y., settled here in 1835, where he became one of 
the town's early school teachers, and later a pro- 
minent real estate operator. He first taught school 
in the county seminary on the site of the present 
county jail. He led in the establishment of free 
schools, and directed raising of funds for the first 
Clay school building. 

Following his teaching career, he became clerk in 
the government land office. He was married in 
1836, to Jane Suttenfield, daughter of Col. and Mrs. 
William Suttenfield, among Fort Wayne's first 
settlers. 






LEADER IN G. E. 
DEVELOPMENT HERE 

Edward A. Barnes (1865-1959), former general 
superintendent, Fort Wayne Works, General Elec- 
tric Company, was one of the country's leading 
electrical pioneers. 

Born in' India, educated in England, he began his 
electrical career in 1884, with the Edison interests 
in London. He joined the Fort Wayne Electric Co., 
in 1889, which later merged with G.E. Mr. Barnes 
worked his way up from chief inspector to general 
superintendent. He resigned June, 1931, after 42 
years with the company. He was one of the last 
members of the Edison Pioneers, former associates 
of the Wizard of Menlo Park. 



OPERATED TRADING 
POST, GRIST MILL 

James Barnett (1785-1851) settled here in 1818, 
and later joined Samuel Hanna in operation of a 
trading post. And in 1827, they established Fort 
Wayne's first grist mill south of town along the St. 
Mary’s River. A dam was built, furnishing water 
power for the mill. 

Barnett built the town's first brick house on Colum- 
bia St., in 1824. He also owned a log house at Cal- 
houn and Berry, which, in 1849, was converted Into 
a receiving center for victims of a cholera epi- 
demic. Barnett’s wife was Nancy W. Hanna, sister of 
Samuel Hanna. 

Before coming here, Barnett served In Gen. Harri- 
son’s army. He took part In the July 4, 1835, 
celebration, signalling the opening of canal opera- 
tions between Fort Wayne and Huntington. 



PROMINENT LAWYER 
OVER HALF CENTURY 

James M. Barrett, Sr., (1852-1929) after studying 
law in Chicago, came to Fort Wayne in 1876, 
where he became one of the ablest lawyers in the 
Middle West. For over a half century he repre- 
sented some of the largest business interests here 
in his capacity as corporation lawyer. 

At the time of his death, Mr. Barrett was senior 
member of the legal firm, Barrett, Barrett & Mc- 
Nagny. He was president and chief legal counsel 
for the Fort Wayne and Northern Indiana Traction 
Co., 1913-1917, which later reorganized as Indiana 
Service Corp., and now part of Indiana-Michigan 
Electric Co. 

Mr. Barrett served two terms as Indiana State Sen- 
ator, and in 1889, authored the Barrett law. 



FOUNDER OF BASH 
GRAIN CO., 1870 

Solomon Bash (1828-1912) was founder of the old 
S. Bash & Co., pioneer Fort Wayne grain firm. He 
was a prominent grain dealer in northern Indiana 
for 62 years. 

Born in Ohio, Mr. Bash came here in 1848, joining 
Hill & Orbison, and later R. W. Taylor Co., grain 
dealers on the banks of the Wabash & Erie Canal, 
then one of the main arteries used by grain ship- 
pers of this region. In 1870, Mr. Bash founded the 
firm bearing his name. 

Among his s.even children were the late Charles S. 
Bash, former head of the Bash firm, and the late 
Harry E. Bash, formerly president of the old May- 
flower Mills. 



FOUNDER OF OLD 
BASS FOUNDRY 

John H. Bass (1835-1922) was founder of the old 
Bass Foundry & Machine works and dean of Fort 
Wayne's pioneer manufacturers. Flis country 
home, "Brookside", was one of Northern Indiana's 
most attractive suburban estates. The Bass man- 
sion, surrounded by 300 wooded acres and arti- 
ficial lakes, is now the home of St. Francis College. 

For more than 60 years, Mr. Bass was a leader 
in the financial and industrial life of Fort Wayne. 
Chief products of his foundry were railroad car 
wheels, axles, Corliss engines, boilers, power 
plants. 

Mr. Bass for many years was president of the 
former First National Bank. 



BUSINESS PIONEER, 
CIVIL WAR HERO 

Col. Sion S. Bass (1827-1862) came to Fort 
Wayne in 1848, from Salem, Ky. He found em- 
ployment with the great western fur traders, 
Ewing, Chute and Company. In 1853, he became 
a member of Jones, Bass, and Company, manu- 
facturers of iron products. 

He was a brother of John H. Bass, founder of the 
old Bass Foundry & Machine Works of Fort 
Wayne. Sion, at the outbreak of the Civil War, 
left his business to aid in the formation of the 
famous Thirtieth Indiana Regiment. He was com- 
missioned a colonel Sept. 12, 1861. He was 
wounded April 7, 1862, at the Battle of Shiloh, 
and died seven days later at Paducah. 

Col. Bass rests in Lindenwood, where a memorial 
was erected in his memory by his regiment and 
friends. 



LEADER IN EARLY 
SOCIAL WORK HERE 

Miss Minette Baum (1879-1956) was for many years one 
of Fort Wayne’s prominent social workers. She was one of 
the founders and first secretary of the Fort Wayne Jewish 
Federation, and one of the organizers of the Fort Wayne 
Woman's Club. 

Miss Baum also aided in founding both the local 
Hadassah Chapter, and the Fort Wayne Zionist district. As 
a social worker, she assisted in organizing the League for 
the Blind and the Inter-Racial Commission. She made two 
trips to Palestine to engage in welfare work there. 

Formerly of Russia, Miss Baum came to America at age 
three. She lived In Fort Wayne 45 years. She was a 
graduate of Chicago University: a member of the Acduth 
Vesholom Congregation, and an honorary member of 
B'nal Jacob Congregation. She was active in the affairs of 
the Goodwill Industries, Urban League, College Club and 
Fortnightly Club. 



SOL. D. BAYLESS 
PROMINENT MASON 

Solomon D. Bayless, (1814-1875) former local 
postmaster, was one of Fort Wayne's distinguished 
Freemasons of his time. Sol D. Bayless Lodge No. 
359 F. & A.M., was founded In his honor In 1866. 
He became a Mason in Troy, 0., and affiliated here 
with Wayne Lodge No. 25, becoming its Master in 
1861. He later became head of the four grand 
bodies of Indiana Freemasonry. 

He resided ina brickdwelling atWayneandClinton, 
and for a number of years was U.S. Pension Agent. 
He died May 30, 1875, and friends came from all 
parts of the midwest for his funeral. 



BEADELL FOUNDED 
PEOPLE’S STORE 

Henry A. Beadell (1862-1947) was founder of the 
People's Store, which later became the Boston 
Store, 110 East Berry St. He also helped in organiz- 
ing the Lincoln National Life Insurance Co., the Lin- 
coln National Bank & Trust Co., the Wayne Pump 
Co., and the Peoples Trust Bank. 

He remained a director of Lincoln Life and Peoples 
Trust until hisdeath. He was a former director In the 
other organizations. 

Mr. Beadell was active in many civic affairs. During 
World I, he served on the draft board and also was 
Allen County coal administrator. 



PAST PRESIDENT 
OF BOWSER FIRM 

Sylvanus B. Bechtel (1878-1946) was president of 
the former S.F. Bowser & Co., and a leader in com- 
munity affairs. Born and educated in Barry County, 
Mich., he began his career as a school teacher, prin- 
cipal and bookkeeper. 

Mr. Bechtel became associated with the Bowser 
firm (pump manufacturers) in 1899, where he first 
worked in sales and advertising. He became 
general manager in 1915, and president in 1921. 

He was the first president of the reorganized YMCA 
in 1916; assisted in the reorganization of the Com- 
mercial Club into the Chamber of Commerce, and 
was a trustee of Plymouth Congregational Church. 






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EARLY LEADER IN 
LOCAL CHARITIES 

Mrs. Jessie Maria Bond (1844-1914) was well known here 
for her philanthropic work before and after the turn of the 
century. At the time of her death it was reported, “perhaps 
no one individual in the city took a greater interest in 
works of charity than did Mrs. Bond." 

Mrs. Bond was especially interested in the development 
of the old Hope Hospital, the Visiting Nurses League and 
the Allen County Children’s Home. She was the daughter 
of Jesse Vermilyea and was born in the old Vermilyea 
mansion built in 1839 in Aboite township. Her father was 
one of the original directors of the Fort Wayne Branch 
Bank. 

Mrs. Bond was the wife of the late Stephen E. Bond, 
former president of the Old National Bank. 



JAMES W. BORDEN, 
NOTED JUDGE HERE 

James W. Borden (1810-1882) came here in 1839, 
to take charge of the government land office. Two 
years later he became judge of the Twelfth Judicial 
Circuit. In 1850, he prepared legislation providing 
for revision of the state constitution. 

After reorganization of the Indiana judiciary, 
Borden was elected judge of the Common Pleas 
Court, serving until 1857, when he resigned to be- 
come U.S. Minister to Hololulu. In 1864, he was 
again chosen judge of the Common Pleas Court, 
and then later became judge of Allen Criminal 
Court, serving until 1882. 

He was educated in New York, and admitted to 
practice before the New York Supreme Court. 


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EARLY BUILDER 
IN FORT WAYNE 

Christian Boseker (1841-1900 came to Fort Wayne 
with his parents in 1846, from Saxony, Germany. He 
was educated here, and later became a carpenter. 
He enlisted in Company E, Thirtieth Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry soon after the outbreak of the 
Civil War, and was discharged in 1863, because of 
physical disability. 

Returning home, he resumed the carpenter's trade 
and later formed his own construction firm. Among 
structures built by Mr. Boseker were the Allen 
County Jail, old Masonic Temple, 1884, former First 
Presbyterian Church, 1885, and the old City Hall, 
1892. 



INDUSTRIALIST, 

PUMP INVENTOR 

Sylvanus F . Bowser (1854-1938) was the founder 
and for many years president of the former S. F. 
Bowser & Company, Inc. He was inventor of the 
self-measuring gasoline pump. The Bowser firm 
began operations in 1885, with the manufacture of 
kerosene pumps and then expanding to develop- 
ment and sale of gasoline pumps. Its products 
were sold world-wide. 

As his pump business grew, Mr. Bowser became 
interested in other business and financial enter- 
prises. At one time, he was president of the 
Bowser Loan & Trust Company. He was a deeply 
religious man. He gave generously of his time 
and money to Fort Wayne religious organizations. 



PIONEER JURIST 
OF ALLEN COUNTY 

Joseph Brackenridge (1823-1891) was one of Al- 
len County's distinguished pioneer jurists. Born in 
Brookville, Ind., he moved here with his parents in 
1830. He was educated in Fort Wayne schools, stu- 
died law with his uncle, Robert Brackenridge, and 
admitted to the bar in 1846. He served as county 
prosecutor for several years. 

In 1856, Brackenridge was appointed judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas to fill the unexpired term of 
Judge James W. Borden. Subsequently he was 
elected to the same office for four years; became 
judge of the Criminal Court, and then a successful 
railroad attorney 





FIRST LOCAL GOP 
REPRESENTATIVE 

Samuel Brenton, (1810-1857) minister and edu- 
cator, was the first local Republican to serve in the 
U.S. House of Representatives. He became 
congressman in 1850, as a Whig, but lost his bid for 
re-election in 1852. He regained his house seat in 
1854, and in this session voted with the new Repu- 
blican party. He was re-elected in 1856, but died 
before congress reconvened. 

Brenton was the sixth president of Fort Wayne 
Female College, (Taylor University), 1853-1855, 
and was regarded as the most outstanding presi- 
dent during the college's early years. He was born 
and educated in Kentucky. He came here In 1841. 
He was pastor of Berry Street M.E. Church In 1846, 
and In 1849, became Fort Wayne land agent. 



PROMINENT DOCTOR 
IN FRONTIER DAYS 


Dr. William H. Brooks (1813-1894) came here in 
1841, and for nearly a half century was a prominent 
physician in Fort Wayne and Northern Indiana. He 
was born in Weston, Mass.; taught school in Ver- 
mont and Ohio; studied medicine; and began 
practicing in Ohio in 1836. 

When Dr. Brooks arrived here. Fort Wayne was a 
frontier village. Other practicing physicians of his 
time in Fort Wayne were Doctors Thompson, 
Beecher, Ormiston, Huxford, Sturgis, Schmitz and 
Sevenrick. 

He lived to see the city become a railroad center 
and the beginning of its industrial expansion. 




PROSECUTOR, CITY 
ATTORNEY, JUDGE 

Judge William W. Carson (1820-1890) cameto Fort 
Wayne from Canada in 1837, to work for Col. 
Marshall S. Wines, general contractor. While 
associated with Wines, Carson had the opportunity 
to read extensively in the colonel's private library. 
Later, Carson taught school, read law, and gradu- 
ated from Indiana University law school in 1849. 

After leaving school he became Adams county pro- 
secuting attorney. Fort Wayne city attorney in 1850, 
Allen county attorney in 1860, state senator in 
1862, and, in 1869, judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas. In 1874, he was appointed judge of the 
Thirty-Eighth Judicial Circuit by Gov. Thomas A. 
Hendricks. 






NOTED ATTORNEY 
FOR MANY YEARS 

David H. Colerick (1805-1887) wasfor43yearsone 
of Fort Wayne's most successful lawyers. He came 
here in 1829, after studying law at Lancaster, 0. He 
saw Fort Wayne emerge from a frontier village, to 
the canal era, and into the railroad age. 

He was elected a State Representative in 1833, and 
a State Senator in 1835. His district extended from 
the Wabash River to Michigan, from Ohio to Illinois. 
He was a delegate to the 1864 Chicago Democratic 
National Convention which nominated McClellan 
for President. Mr. Colerick declined twice to be the 
Democratic nominee for Congress, preferring to 
devote his entire time to practice of law. 



LIBRARY EXPANDED 
UNDER HER CARE 

Miss Margaret M. Colerick (1857-1934) served 
with great distinction as head of Fort Wayne-Allen 
County Library. She became assistant librarian in 
1895, and three years later was chief librarian. 

This kindly, cultured, little lady, truly laid the 
groundwork for the extensive expansion of the 
local library. During the 36 years of her leader- 
ship, the institution grew from a 3,600 book col- 
lection to a major library. 



BUSINESS PIONEER 
ON COLUMBIA STREET 

David F. Comparet, (1826-1903) born in Fort 
Wayne when the city was a frontier village, was 
educated here and at St. Mary's College in Ken- 
tucky. He worked with his father, Francis Com- 
paret, in the milling business on Columbia Street, 
and in the construction of mills and dams. 

In 1847, David built a warehouse at Columbia and 
Lafayette, and later operated a commission house. 
He was married in 1 846 to Sarah Henrietta Colum- 
bia, daughter of a pioneer Fort Wayne family. 
Their wedding was quite a social event. The 
bridal party was accompanied to the Catholic 
church by a military band. The wedding ceremony 
was performed by the Rev. Julian Benoit, pioneer 
missionary priest. 



EARLY PROMOTER 
OF REAL ESTATE 

Louis F. Curdes (1863-1934) was one of Fort 
Wayne's early realtors and builder of Forest Park 
addition. He entered in the real estate business 
in 1893. His first venture was in the sale of the 
former Williams Park, which now includes the 
tract bounded by Webster, Woodland, Hoagland, 
and Creighton. 

The Forest Park addition was opened in 1905, to 
promote lot sales. Mr. Curdes built Forest Park 
Boulevard with its wide center parkway. His ef- 
forts were successful. In a short time nearly every 
lot in the district was sold. Other developments 
by Mr. Curdes included Driving Park addition and 
Klug Park. 


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LED IN BANKING 
BUSINESS CIRCLES 

Frank H. Cutshall (1876-1943) was a leader in busi- 
ness and banking circles here for many years. He 
was a native of Allen County, and educated in Fort 
Wayne public schools. 

Following his long and distinguished banking 
career he was president of Wayne Hardware Co., 
First Joint Stock Land Bank, and chairman of the 
board of directors of American Steel Dredge Co., 
and American Steel Supply, Co. 

He was formerly president of the Old National Bank 
and its successor, the Old First National Bank and 
Trust Co. 



/ 



JOHN W. DAWSON, 
LINCOLN APPOINTEE 

John W. Dawson (1820-1877) had an outstanding 
career in early Fort Wayne history. He began 
practicing law here in 1843; became proprietor 
of his own newspaper in 1854, and in 1861, 
President Lincoln appointed him Territorial Gov- 
ernor of Utah. 

Dawson served but a short time in Utah, returning 
here to his newspaper and to compile an early 
history of Fort Wayne. His essay on Johnny (Chap- 
man) Appleseed has been the most important 
single source of data about Chapman. Other local 
historians like Griswold, Robertson, Detzer relied 
heavily on Dawson's work. 



PENNSY OFFICIAL; 
CHIEF OF POLICE 

Capt. Hugh M. Deihl (1845-1913) was a key official 
in the mechanical department of the Fort Wayne 
division, Pennsylvania Railroad, for nearly a half 
century with the exception of 13 years when he 
served as Fort Wayne police chief, 1876 to 1889. 

He was born and educated in Philadelphia; com- 
pleted a technical course at the Baldwin Locomo- 
tive Works; joined the Union Army at age 16; be- 
came an Infantry captain. Although wounded in 
combat, he served throughout the war. 

Capt. Deihl was a member of the first Scottish Rite 
class here In 1886; also a member of Knights Temp- 
lar, Mizpah Shrine Temple and the First Presby- 
terian Church. 



FIRST DIRECTOR 
AT LINDENWOOD 

John H. Doswell (1827-1900) becanne superin- 
tendent and landscape architect at Lindenwood 
Cemetery in 1859, and he remained in this position 
until 1900. He was succeeded by his son, Harry 
J. Doswell. Lindenwood owes much to the Dos- 
wells for its original landscaping, building of rus- 
tic bridges, gardens, historic stone houses, and 
caves. 

Mr. Doswell was born in London, England, and 
educated at Southhampton. He learned his pro- 
fession at the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew. He 
emigrated to Cincinnati in 1852, to continue his 
work as a gardener. While at Lindenwood, Mr. 
Doswell designed McCulloch, Lawton and Hayden 
Parks. 



PROMINENT JUDGE 
IN FORT WAYNE 

D. Burns Douglass (1879-1947) was a prominent 
attorney and judge in Fort Wayne for 42 years. He 
served as city judge in 1923 and 1924, and Superior 
Court 2 judge in 1942 and 1943. He was graduated 
by Fort Wayne High School in 1899, and by Dart- 
mouth College In 1903. 

After two years with The Fort Wayne Journal-Gazet- 
te sports department, he entered the law office of 
former Judge Samuel M. Hensch in 1905. He was a 
deacon of Plymouth Congregational Church, where 
he sang in the choir. 

Judge Douglass was active In Scottish Rite and was 
made a Thirty- Third Degree Scottish Rite Mason in 
1925. 



NOTED PIONEER 
OF FORT WAYNE 

John B. DuBois (1806-1876) was one of Fort 
Wayne’s well known pioneers. He was a member of 
the board of trustees of the Village of Fort Wayne 
after its original incorporation in 1829. He came 
here from New Orleans where he was born of 
French parents. 

He began his career here inthetailoring business in 
partnership with John Edsall. Later Mr. DuBois be- 
came a lawyer and real estate agent. He served as 
Wayne township justice of peace and was known as 
“Squire" DuBois. He resided first in the historic 
council house on East Main, and then built the 
DuBois home at East Lewis and Hanna Sts. 





NOTED SURGEON, 
LUTHERAN LEADER 

Dr. Herman A. Duemling (1871-1927) for 22 
years was chief of the Lutheran Hospital surgical 
staff; founder and director of the Duemling Clinic. 
This was one of the first medical clinics estab- 
lished in the Mid-West. Dr. Duemling was recog- 
nized as one of the leading surgeons for his time. 

He \A/az also a leader in various activities of the 
Lutheran Church, especially in the development of 
the Lutheran Hospital and its school of nursing. 
He led in the organization of the Lutheran Uni- 
versity Association which acquired Valparaiso Uni- 
versity, converting it into a Lutheran institution. 

He was also one of the founders of the American 
Luther League and its president. 



ECKART PACKING 
PUNT FOUNDER 

Fred Eckart (1830-1894) was founder of the old 
Eckart meat packing plant at 1825 West Main 
Street, which for many years was one of Fort 
Wayne's thriving businesses. He came here from 
Bavaria in 1849 as a poor butcher boy, but at the 
close of his career he left an estate valued at a 
half million dollars. 

He first opened a meat market on West Jefferson, 
with Henry Strong as partner. Their capital was 
limited, but trade was promising and the venture 
proved successful. At the close of the Civil War, 
Mr. Eckart enlarged his operations by establishing 
the Eckart pork packing plant. This, too, proved 
successful and profitable. 



SUCCESSFUL IN 
BUSINESS, POLITICS 

Alfred P. Edgerton, (1813-1897) politician and 
very successful businessman, was born and edu- 
cated at Plattsburg, N. Y. In 1837, he settled at 
Hicksville, 0., where he managed extensive land 
holdings for the American Land Co. Later he be- 
came owner of 40,000 acres of valuable land in 
northwestern Ohio. He was elected to Congress 
in 1850, from Ohio, and re-elected in 1852. 

He came to Fort Wayne in 1857, and with Hugh 
McCulloch and Pliny Hoagland leased the Wa- 
bash-Erie Canal, Edgerton becoming general man- 
ager. He was also active in Indiana politics and 
ran for lieutenant governor in 1868, but was de- 
feated. He served on the federal civil service 
board under appointment by President Cleveland. 



LED CONSOLIDATION 
OF RAILROAD LINES 

Joseph K. Edgerton (1818-1893) attained wide 
prominence in political and railroad history in 
Fort Wayne and the Middle West. He came here 
in 1844, to practice law with former Governor 
Samuel Bigger. 

Edgerton became interested in the construction 
of the first railroads in 1854. He was elected a 
director of the Fort Wayne & Chicago Railroad 
and later president, succeeding Judge Samuel 
Hanna. He led the consolidation of several rail- 
roads into the Pennsylvania Railroad. He served 
one term in Congress, being elected in 1862. He 
was known as one of the largest land owners in 
this region. 



PIONEER BUILDER 
IN FORT WAYNE 

Samuel Edsall (1805-1865) settled here in 1824, 
becoming a pioneer miller. In 1842, he and William 
Rockhill established two band sawmills, operated 
with water power from the canal. A year later he 
opened the famous Edsall-Orff stone mill. 

Mr. Edsall was one of the buildersof the first court- 
house in 1831; built the second courthouse in 
1847; and the third in 1858. He was associated with 
his brothers, William S. and Simon, in the construc- 
tion of the Wabash Railroad through Fort Wayne. 
Another brother, John, was a pioneer tailor here. 
The Edsalls were prominently identified with Fort 
Wayne’s early development. 



LAND OFFICE HEAD, 
BUILT PLANK ROAD 

William S. Edsall (1809-1876) fora half century was 
a leading citizen in Fort Wayne’s early development. 
His first job was with U.S. Engineers, surveying a 
route for the Wabash and Erie Canal. Later he joined 
the Ewings in fur trading and mercantile business. 

In 1840, he became a memberof Fort Wayne's first 
common council and head of the U.S. Land Office in 
1843. He and his brother, Samuel, and Judge 
Samuel Hanna formed a company, buildingthe Fort 
Wayne-Bluffton plank road. 

Mr. Edsall died In his home at West Main and Cass. 
Former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, Hugh M. 
McCulloch attended the funeral. 



RAN DRUGSTORE 
FOR MANY YEARS 

Miss Julia E. Emanuel (1871-1962) was one of Fort 
Wayne's first woman pharmacists. She came here 
following graduation in 1889, from Michigan Uni- 
versity, where she was the only girl in a class of 41 
receiving a pharmaceutical degree. She first work- 
ed as a pharmacist for Meyer Drugs, and later 
opened her own store in the old arcade on Berry. 

In 1909, Miss Emanuel moved her store to Berry 
and Harrison, and later the^Miss Emanuel Chemist 
Shop", was located on West Wayne near Harrison. 
She retired in 1943. 

Miss Emanuel organized the Fort Wayne U. of M. 
Club, and she was eighty when she saw Michigan 
play in the Rose Bowl. She was active In civic affairs. 



FIRST ATTORNEY 
IN ALLEN COUNTY 

Charles W. Ewing (1798-1843) was the first judge of 
Allen County Probate Court and the first lawyer in 
Fort Wayne. He was the eldest son of Col. Alexander 
and Charlotte Ewing, who settled here in 1822. The 
Ewings were important figures in the early devel- 
opment of this community. 

On August 9, 1824, the first session of Allen Circuit 
Court began and Charles Ewing was the prose- 
cutor, and for the first term he received a $5.00 fee. 
He was, for a time. President Judge of the Eighth 
Judicial Circuit. He was a brilliant lawyer and a 
fascinating orator. 

Judge Ewing was secretary of the first Masonic 
Lodge in Allen County, Wayne Lodge No. 25, 
organized in 1823. His father was its first Worship- 
ful Master. 



FUR TRADING LED 
TO EWING WEALTH 

Col. George W. Ewing (1804-1866) was one of 
Fort Wayne's early pioneers. He, along with his 
brother, William G. Ewing, (1801-1854), became 
fur traders in 1826. Later their commercial en- 
terprises extended from the Alleghenies to the 
Rockies. Their combined estates exceeded two 
million dollars. 

Their father. Col. Alexander Ewing, who fought in 
the Revolutionary War and War of 1812, died in 
1827. He was buried on Ewing property which 
later became a part of Lindenwood Cemetery. 
Above the large Ewing underground vault In Lin- 
denwood is the $25,000 35-foot Ewing monu- 
ment, the finest single shaft of Scotch granite in 
America. Here also rests Charles W. Ewing, (1798- 
1843) successful lawyer, eldest son of Alexander 
Ewing. 



CAPT. FAIRFIELD, 

SEAMAN TO FARMER 

Capt. Asa Fairfield, (1797-1868) a seafaring man, 
born in Kennebunkport, Me., settled here in 1834, 
where he operated the first boat on the Wabash- 
Erie Canal. He served in the War of 1812, aboard 
one of the first privately owned ships licensed by 
the government to act against enemy shipping. 
He was taken prisoner by the British and confined 
for six months in Dartmouth Prison. 

After working on the canal, Capt. Fairfield pur- 
chased a large tract of land south of Fort Wayne 
and became a successful farmer. He was active 
in the old Second Presbyterian Church and the 
Masonic Lodge. 

Fairfield Avenue was named in his honor. 


IS 



EARLY LUMBER 
MILL OPERATOR 

John Ferguson (1834-1917) became one of Fort 
Wayne’s leading manufacturers and lumbermen in 
the mid 1800's. Born and educated near Quebec, 
he settled here in 1855. He entered the lumber 
business in 1861, establishing two large mills along 
the Fort Wayne & Muncie Railroad. Chicago was the 
principal market for his lumber. 

He became associated with other businesses. He 
was a director of the Fort Wayne Gas Co., and presi- 
dent of the Bluffton Gravel Road Co. He owned 
1,000 acres of improved land In Allen, Huntington, 
Wells and Marshall counties. 

Mr. Ferguson and his wife, Eliza, were members of 
the First Baptist Church. 



CHOSEN FIRST 
CITY ATTORNEY 

Lucien P. Ferry (1810-1844) became Fort Wayne’s 
first city attorney following the city's incorporation 
and election in 1840. Although he died at an early 
age, he had become an outstanding layiyer and poli- 
tician. He moved herefrom Monroe, Mich., in 1831. 

He became judge of the probate court in 1835 and 
Indiana state representative in 1842. 

His father, Peter Peyre de Ferry, native of France, 
served as chief of battalion under Napoleon Bona- 
parte, and fled to America as a peasant after the fall 
of the emperor. 

Lucien Ferry's widow, Caroline Bourie, who lived to 
be 100, died here in 1915. 






LEADER OF VAST 
UTILITY COMBINE 

Robert M. Feustel, (1884-1932) born and reared 
in Fort Wayne, becanne a nationally known public 
service engineer and utility executive. He headed 
numerous utilities of the Middle West with a com- 
bined capitalization of $300,000,000. 

He was president of Indiana Service Corp., a com- 
bined street railway, light and power company in 
Fort Wayne; vice-chairman of Northern Indiana 
Public Service; president. Midland United, utility 
holding company; president, Indiana Railroad Sys- 
tem; president, Chicago, South Shore & South 
Bend Railroad, and president. Public Service Com- 
pany of Indiana. 

Mr. Feustel was graduated by Purdue University 
and began his professional career with the old Fort 
Wayne & Wabash Valley Traction Co. 






BECAME PUBLISHER 
OF NEWS-SENTINEL 

Oscar G. Foeliinger, (1885-1936) born and reared 
in Fort Wayne, became publisher of the News- 
Sentinel. He died suddenly while on a hunting 
trip in British Columbia. He was nationally known 
in newspaper and advertising circles, and recog- 
nized as a competent and successful newspaper 
publisher. 

His career began as an assistant bank cashier in 
1901. In 1905, he became bookkeeper for The 
Journal-Gazette, and later its business manager. 
Leaving Fort Wayne in 1910, he practiced public 
accounting on the west coast. Returning here in 
1912, he joined the News Publishing Company, 
and in 1920, he became publisher of The News- 
Sentinel. 




BEGAN FORTRIEDE 
SHOE STORE, 1863 

Louis Fortriede, Sr., (1840- 1922) was founder of the 
former Fortriede shoe store which was one of the 
oldest commercial enterprises in Fort Wayne. The 
business opened In 1863, and closed August 15, 
1967, when the store at 615 Calhoun was razed to 
make way for the new City-County Building. 

Fortriede came here from Germany In 1861. He 
served with the Union Army at the outbreak of the 
Civil War, and upon returning here, opened his store 
In the 100 block of West Main. It was relocated on 
Calhoun In 1887. 

For many years, four Fortriede sons carried on their 
father's business: Waldemar, Edwin, Louis, Jr., and 
Albert. 



FATHER OF CITY'S 
FINE PARK SYSTEM 

Col. David N. Foster (1841-1934) for 25 years 
served as president of the Fort Wayne Park Board. 
Until his death, he was known as the father of Fort 
Wayne's parks. Col. Foster and his brother, the 
late Samuel M. Foster, donated the land in 1912, 
for the establishment of Foster Park. 

Col. Foster served three years in the Civil War; 
was on Gen. Mead's staff at the Battle of Gettys- 
burg, and he was wounded in the battle of Fred- 
ericksburg. After the war, he became active in the 
Grand Army of the Republic, both on the state and 
national levels. 

Col. Foster came here in 1877, and was engaged 
in the retail furniture business. Fie assisted in the 
organization of the Wayne Knitting Mills and the 
Lincoln National Bank. 



S. M. FOSTER LED 
IN CITY'S GROWTH 

Samuel M. Foster (1851-1935) was one of Fort 
Wayne's most outstanding business and civic lead- 
ers. His career began as a cash-boy and bundle 
wrapper in a New York store. Later he was gradu- 
ated by Yale University where he achieved a bril- 
liant scholastic record. Coming here in 1879, Mr. 
Foster embraced an interest in law, journalism, 
manufacturing and merchandising. 

His successful business enterprises led him into 
the field of banking and life insurance. He was 
one of the organizers of Lincoln National Bank & 
Trust Co. and Lincoln National Life Insurance Co. 
For both institutions he was their first president 
and later board chairman. He was truly a driving 
force in the development of the city. 



FOUNDER OF FRANK 
DRY GOODS STORE 

Marx Frank (1836-1923) was founder and presi- 
dent of the former Frank Dry Goods Company, and 
he was an outstanding leader in the development of 
Jewish religious movements of the city. He was 
president of Achduth Vesholom Congregation for 
40 years. Three temples were built by that congre- 
gation under his direction. 

Born in Bavaria, Germany, Mr. Frank came to this 
country when 17 years of age. After a brief time in 
New York, he came to Fort Wayne in 1862, and 
several years later founded the firm which bore his 
name. 

He was succeeded in management of the Frank 
Store by his son, the late Theodore Frank, and by his 
grandsons, the late Eugene Frank and the late Jack 
Frank. 


i 



PERFECTION BISCUIT 
COMPANY FOUNDER 

John B. Franke, (1866-1927) founder and presi- 
dent of Perfection Biscuit Company, was one of 
Fort Wayne's outstanding business and civic 
leaders of his time. Under his management, Per- 
fection grew from a small brick building on Barr 
Street, with a single oven, to its modern facilities 
on Pearl Street. He was also a stockholder In a 
number of other Fort Wayne manufacturing and 
mercantile enterprises. 

Mr. Franke was chairman of the building commit- 
tee which erected the Trinity English Lutheran 
Church edifice at West Wayne and Ewing, and was 
active In its dedication in 1926. He loved music, 
and he arranged and financed many concerts here. 
He donated to the city the large tract of land known 
as Franke Park. 



MASONIC LEADER 
FOR 45 YEARS 

William Geake (1849-1927) for 45 years was 
identified with every important development in 
Fort Wayne and Indiana freemasonry. He be- 
came a Mason in 1871, at Steubenville, 0. In 
1882, he led the movement resulting in chartering 
four Fort Wayne Scottish Rite bodies; was Grand 
Master, Grand Lodge of Indiana, 1899-1900; be- 
came Scottish Rite Deputy for Indiana in 1902, 
holding that office until 1927. 

Born in Bristol, England, Mr. Geake settled here in 
1878. A stone cutter by trade, he served as fore- 
man during construction of the old Masonic 
Temple, East Wayne and Clinton. 



FAMOUS CIVIL WAR 
NURSE BURIED HERE 

Mrs. Eliza E. George, (1808-1865) Fort Wayne's 
noted Civil War nurse, died of typhoid fever in 
an army camp, Wilmington, N.C., a month after 
Lee's surrender at Appomattox. She gave her life, 
like thousands of others, in the terrible struggle 
to preserve the Union. She accompanied Indiana 
regiments, nursing the sick, wounded, and became 
known affectionately as "Mother George." 

Mrs. George was buried in Lindenwood Cemetery 
with full military honors and the Indiana Sanitary 
Commission erected a monument to her memory. 
She rests in the family plot of Fort Wayne's other 
great Civil War hero. Col. Sion S. Bass, who fell 
at Shiloh. 



CONGRESSMAN 
FOR FIVE TERMS 

Dr. George W. Gillie (1881-1963) was elected to 
Congress In 1938, serving five consecutive terms. 
Previously he was Allen County sheriff from 19 16 to 
1918, and was elected sheriff again in 1928 and 
1934. He also practiced his profession as a 
veterinarian for many years. As a Congressman, he 
became nationally known for his efforts to eradi- 
cate the hoof and mouth disease among livestock. 

He was a star football player at Ohio State Univer- 
sity, and one of the first men elected to the National 
Football Hall of Fame. Dr. Gillie was a Republican, 
but his long list of personal friends was altogether 
bipartisan. 



SERVED IN 12TH'S 
FAMED REGIMENT 

Capt. John M. Godown (1832-191 1) former Fort 
Wayne city clerk, civil engineer and prominent 
Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago Railway of- 
ficial, was one of this city's distinguished Civil 
War soldiers. 

Godown served with Company K, Twelfth Indiana 
Regiment, participating in 28 battles during the 
long and costly struggle to preserve the Union. 
This regiment fought at Richmond, Ky., and then 
joined Grant at Memphis. It served in the seige 
and victory at Vicksburg. Godown was with Sher- 
man in the long march from Memphis to Chatta- 
nooga. The Twelfth also fought at Mission Ridge, 
at Knoxville, and in the Atlanta campaign. It 
marched with Sherman to Savannah, into the Caro- 
lines and south to Richmond, Va. 



FOUNDED INDIANA 
FURNITURE STORE 

William F. Graeter (1863-1949) was a civic leader 
and prominent Fort Wayne businessman for many 
years. Born in Madison, Ind., he came here in 1881, 
and was one of the founders, and an officer of the 
Old Indiana Furniture Co. He was active in the local 
and national Chambers of Commerce, and was first 
vice-president of the former FortWayne Morris Plan 
Bank. He was also organizer of the Fort Wayne 
Printing Co. 

Mr. Graeter was a member of Sol D. Bayless Lodge, 
F. and A.M.; Scottish Rite and Mizpah Shrine 
Temple. 





FARMER, STOCK 
DEALER TO MAYOR 

Jesse A. Grice, (1852-1915) successful farmer, 
stock dealer, meat market operator, became an 
ardent Republican worker here before the turn of 
the century. In recognition of his faithful work for 
the G.O.P., he was nominated and elected sheriff 
in 1904, and re-elected two years later. 

Shortly after retirement as sheriff, he was per- 
suaded to run for mayor. He ran and was elected 
November 2, 1909. During his administration, the 
city paved many additional miles of streets, side- 
walks; improved street lighting; enlarged the city 
park system; and completed negotiations for rail- 
road track elevation over Calhoun, Fairfield and 
Broadway. 





WILLIAM M. GRIFFIN 
HEADED WAYNE 
PUMP 

William M. Griffin (1870-1937) was president of the 
former Wayne Pump Company and for many years a 
prominent industrialist and civic leader. He attended 
school in Noble County and Tri-State Normal College. 

He served with the U.S. Army during the Spanish- 
American War. After discharge he came to Fort Wayne 
and was engaged in commercial work until 1914, when 
he became president of Wayne Pump. 

He was a director of Lincoln National Bank and member 
of Lincoln National Life's executive committee. 



BERT GRISWOLD, 
CITY HISTORIAN 

Bert J. Griswold (1873-1927) after years of 
research and writing, published in 1917 his “Pic- 
torial History of Fort Wayne." It Is a comprehensive 
document of early Fort Wayne history and Includes 
portraits, short biographical sketches of persons 
closely related to the community's early develop- 
ment. 

Later, he published his “History of Fort Wayne and 
Allen County," containing vignettes of 750 
professional and business leaders of the city. Mr. 
Griswold came here in 1902, and was for 13 years a 
cartoonist for local newspapers. He then opened an 
advertising agency. 

His work in Fort Wayne civic life and historical field 
is a “monument more lasting than marble or 
bronze." 



FORMER BOWSER 
VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert J. Grosvernor (1875-1963) a native of Fort 
Wayne, was vice president of Bowser, Inc. for many 
years, producers of gasoline pumps. He joined the 
Bowser firm as bookkeeper in 1899, and subse- 
quently rose through positions of purchasi ng agent, 
secretary-treasurer, and vice president general 
manager. He retired in 1945 after 46 years with the 
company. 

Mr. Grosvernor was also a community leader and an 
active member of Trinity Episcopal Church where 
he served as a vestryman and warden. He was also 
president of the R & L Concrete Machinery Com- 
pany of Kendallville. 



HEADED FORMER 
GROTH CO. STORE 

John Earl Groth, Sr., (1878*1947) was one of Fort 
Wayne's leading citizens for 25 years, and presi- 
dent of the former Earl Groth & Co., department 
store. He came here in 1921 as general manager of 
the Rurode Store, and in 1925 moved to New York to 
manage the Kresge Department stores. In 1929 he 
acquired the Rurode Store and returned here. The 
store's name was changed to Earl Groth & Co. 

Mr. Groth participated in many local civic affairs; 
served as Plymouth Congregational Church board 
chairman, and had a major interest in his South 
Wind Farms at Ossian. 




HEADED WESTERN 
GAS FOR 30 YEARS 

Olaf N. Guldlin, (1849-1932) was a nationally 
known gas engineer and president of the old West- 
ern Gas Construction Company in Fort Wayne for 30 
years. A native of Norway, he came here in 1884, 
and had a prominent part in the development of the 
city and its industries. 

He was first associated as an engineer with the Kerr- 
Murray Manufacturing Co. here, and later joined 
with W. A. Croxton and Frank D. Moses as gas con- 
sulting engineers, and in the development of Wes- 
tern Gas. 

In 1917, Western Gas merged with Koppers Co. of 
Pittsburgh, and Mr. Guldlin remained with the firm 
until 1922. 



FORMER PUBLISHER 
OF THE SENTINEL 

Edward A.K. Hackett, (1851-1916) former owner 
and publisher of The Fort Wayne Sentinel, was a 
prominent and influential figure in Hoosier journa- 
lism. He was a native of Bloomfield, Pa., where he 
learned the printer's trade. 

In 1874, he purchased half Interest in The Bluffton, 
(Ind.) Banner and later became its sole owner. In 
1880, he purchased The Fort Wayne Sentinel from 
William Fleming and developed it into a pros- 
perous newspaper. He was also publisher of the old 
Indianapolis Sentinel which he sold to devote his 
entire time to his Fort Wayne newspaper. 

He was a prominent member of the First Presby- 
terian Church. 



FOUNDER LINCOLN 
NATIONAL LIFE 

Arthur F. Hall (1872-1942) was founder of Lincoln 
National Life Insurance Company and for 37 years 
one of Fort Wayne's outstanding business and 
civic leaders. He entered the life insurance field 
in 1904 in Indianapolis, and in 1905 came to Fort 
Wayne to direct the organization of Lincoln Life. 
In the beginning he served as secretary and general 
manager, directed the sale of the $100,000 stock 
to organize, and wrote most of the firm's business. 
After the first 100 days, the company had $532,000 
life insurance in force, 

Mr. Hall became Lincoln Life president in 1 923 and 
board chairman in 1939. He lived to see the firm 
expand beyond a billion dollars In ordinary life 
insurance in force. He was a brilliant leader of 
men, a business genius, a lovable friend. 



Allen Hamilton: 1 798-1 864. He came to Fort Wayne 
in 1823, and rose to become a man of wealth and 
a leader in the commercial development of the 
community. He was Allen County's first sheriff 
and aided in negotiating a treaty with the Miami 
Indians. 

Mr. Hamilton in 1835, was named president of the 
Indiana Branch Bank here, and in 1853, he along 
with Hugh McCulloch and Jesse L. Williams 
formed the Allen and Hamilton Co., forerunner of 
a number of Fort Wayne banking institutions. 


PIONEER BANKER, 
COMMUNITY LEADER 


, Mi » 



A GRACIOUS LADY 
OF PIONEER DAYS 

Mrs. Emerine Jane Hamilton, (1810-1889) wife 
of Allen Hamilton, prominent Fort Wayne pioneer 
merchant and banker, was one of Hoosierland's 
great ladies. She loved good literature, worked 
and gave generously in community charities, and 
was a devoted member and leader in the First 
Presbyterian Church. 

She was the daughter of Judge Jesse L. Holman, 
chief justice of the Indiana Supreme Court. After 
her marriage she came here with her husband in 
1827, and they first resided in the Old Fort. Mrs. 
Hamilton started the first public reading room, fore- 
runner of our public library, and was a pioneer in 
the woman sufferage movement. 



CITY OWES MUCH 
TO SAMUEL HANNA 

Samuel Hanna, 1797-1866. Fort Wayne owes 
much to the pioneering leadership of Judge Han- 
na. His enterprising adventures in fur and Indian 
trades, land speculation, and promotion of the 
Wabash-Erie Canal, plank roads and railroads, 
contributed greatly to the population increase and 
economic growth of this region. 

He settled here in 1819, a year before the troops 
evacuated the Fort. Soon after opening a trading 
post at Barr and Columbia, Hanna's long and suc- 
cessful career was underway. He also took an 
active role in governmental policy-making, serving 
as associate judge of Allen County, state repre- 
sentative and state senator. 



S,^!Nln 


rvmfuffm. 



LEADER IN DRUG 
STORE BUSINESS 

Gottlieb H. Heine, (1878-1953) was for many years presi- 
dent of Meyer Brothers Company, pioneei; retail drug es- 
tablishment in Fort Wayne and northeastern Indiana. A 
native of Fort Wayne, Mr. Heine attended Lutheran paro- 
chial schools and Concordia College. 

He became associated in 1897 with Meyer Brothers as 
stenographer, and later he was the key man in reorgani- 
zation and expansion of the firm. Meyer Brothers was sold 
in 1969 to Hook's Drug Stores. 

Mr. Heine was active in the early development of the Fort 
Wayne Chamber of Commerce. He was a member of the 
building committee in the construction of Trinity English 
Lutheran Church and served on the city school board. 



NOTED FIGURE 
IN BASEBALL 

Louis Heilbroner (1861-1933) was a unique figure 
in the world of organized baseball. In 1909, he 
founded and operated here Heilbroner's Baseball 
Bureau Service and published the annual baseball 
Blue Book. He was recognized by the late Judge 
Kenesaw M. Landis, baseball commissioner, as the 
greatest authority in the world on major and minor 
league baseball players and their records. 

He supplied records and statistics on all profes- 
sional, semi-professional and college players. The 
bureau kept an accurate daily record and history of 
every player, and gave clubs reports on sales, 
trades, and lists of eligible players. 

His baseball career began as manager of the St. 
Louis Cardinals in 1900. 



HEADED HOSIERY 
COMPANY HERE 

Henry J. Herbst (1888-1947) was for many years 
one of the city's leadi ng i ndustrial and civic leaders. 
He was organizer of General Hosiery Co. in 1926, 
and served as secretary-treasurer and general 
manager until the plant was sold in 1945 to Got- 
ham Hosiery. 

His career began as cash boy at W & D Store, and 
then he worked for Fort Wayne Electric, Western 
Gas Construction, Fort Wayne Knitting Mills, and 
Thieme Brothers Silk Hosiery Mills. 

He was active in Fort Wayne civic affairs, and was 
chairman of the Fort Wayne Plan Commission. 



CITY’S FIRST 
ORAL SURGEON 

Dr. Victor H. Hilgemann (1886-1972) life long resi- 
dent of Fort Wayne, was the city’s first oral surgeon. 
He practiced here from 1909 to 1958, and was one 
of the original members of the Duemling Clinic. He 
was influential in having fluorine added to Fort 
Wayne's water, making Fort Wayne the first Hoosier 
city to make the addition. 

Dr. Hilgemann attended Michigan University and 
was graduated by Indiana Dental College. He was 
an active member of the Izaak Walton League. 




BUILT RAILROAD, 
WABASH-ERIE CANAL 

Pliny Hoagland (1810-1884) was one of Fort 
Wayne's outstanding pioneer businessmen. He was 
associated with Samuel Hanna and William Mitch- 
ell in building the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chi- 
cago Railroad from Crestline to Fort Wayne. 

Mr. Hoagland was the construction engineer for 
the Wabash and Erie Canal from Toledo to a point 
near Fort Wayne. He was vice president of the old 
Fort Wayne National Bank and senior member of 
Hoagland and Tresselt milling firm. He left a large 
fortune as the result of his successful business 
ventures. 



POLITICAL LEADER, 
LAWYER, BANKER 

Edward G. Hoffman, (1878-1931) in a short life 
span of fifty-two years, excelled as a student, 
lawyer, national political leader, banker and civic 
worker. 

Mr. Hoffman received his B.S. degree at Valpar- 
aiso and law degree at Michigan. He began prac- 
ticing law here in 1900. From 1916 to 1920, he 
was secretary of the Democratic National Com- 
mittee, and became a close friend of President 
Wilson and Vice President Thomas R. Marshall. 
He retired from active law practice in 1927, be- 
coming executive vice-president of Tri-State Loan 
and Trust Co. In the 1930 bank merger he be- 
came vice president of First and Tri-State Na- 
tional Bank. 



LAND PROMOTER, 
LAWYER IN 1800’S 

John Hough, Jr. (1818-1875) settled in Fort Wayne 
in 1843, and became a successful lawyer. He was 
associated with Jones, Bass & Co., manufacturers 
of heavy iron products. 

Mr. Hough practiced law with Worthington, Day and 
Turner. As an agent for eastern land-owners, he 
sold one-half of the lands in Allen and adjoining 
counties, and accumulated a large private fortune. 

He was born in Middlebury, Vt., taught school In Ala- 
bama, and studied law in Cleveland in 1841-42, 
before coming here. 



PAST G.E HEAD, 
BANK PRESIDENT 


Fred S. Hunting (1867-1951 ) was born in Temple- 
ton, Mass., and upon graduation from Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute in 1888, he came to Fort 
Wayne to enter the employ of Fort Wayne Jenney 
Light Co. He remained with the firm, through 
changes of corporate organization, becoming the 
first general manager of the local G.E. plant in 
1916, and then resigning in 1 922, to head Robbins 
& Myers Co., in Springfield, 0. 

He retired in 1927, making his home in Los 
Angeles until 1933, when he returned here to as- 
sume the presidency of the newly organized Fort 
Wayne National Bank. He became chairman of the 
bank board in 1 941 , and retired as an active officer 
in 1947, going to Cincinnati to make his home. 



FIRST DRUGGIST, 
DOCTOR, MAYOR 

Dr. Merchant W. Huxford (1798-1877) settled here 
in 1834, and later became a successful physician 
with a large practice. He also owned and operated 
Fort Wayne's first drug store at Columbia and Barr. 

He was elected mayor of Fort Wayne In 1845, 
succeeding Mayor John M. Wallace, who had 
resigned. The doctor then served three additional 
one-year terms as mayor. Following retirement 
from office and practice of medicine, he lived at his 
suburban home on Spy Run. He formerly owned the 
tract of land now known as Lawton Park. 

Dr. Huxford was born In Conway, Mass., and 
educated at Union College, Schenectady, N.Y. He 
first practiced medicine at St. Marys, 0., before 
locating here. 



BUILDER; ACTIVE 
IN CIVIC AFFAIRS 

Max Irmscher, Sr. (1866-1935) was one of Fort 
Wayne's prominent Duildmg contractors. A native of 
Saxony, Germany, he came here in 1883, to 
become a blacksmith, a bricklayer and general con- 
tractor. He was president of the old Fort Wayne 
Brick & Tile Co., and later organized the Max 
Irmscher & Sons, Inc., general contractors. 

Mr. Irmscher built the Scottish Rite Auditorium, for- 
merly the Mizpah Shrine Temple, the First National 
Bank building, now the Commerce Building, the 
City Filtration plant, Concordia Lutheran Church 
and the former W & D Store. 

He was active in Fort Wayne civic affairs, and was a 
member and trustee of St. Paul's Lutheran Church, 



BRILLIANT CAREER 
IN LAW, POLITICS 

Samuel D. Jackson (1895-1951) was a distin- 
guished lawyer, brilliant orator, and first to serve in 
the U.S. Senate from Fort Wayne. He reached the 
peak of his political career when he served as per- 
manent chairman of the 1944’Chicago Democratic 
National convention that nominated Roosevelt for 
his fourth presidential term, and Truman for Vice- 
President. Jackson subsequently served as a dele- 
gate to the United Nations Food Conference, and 
governor of the Association of American Commo- 
dity Exchanges. 

He was a native of Allen County, Indiana University 
School of Law graduate, and U.S. Army captain in 
World War I. At the time of his death, he was In law 
practice with his son, James W. Jackson and the 
late Thomas Longfellow. 



FOUNDER OF TROY 
LAUNDRY COMPANY 

Fremont L Jones (1855-1935) was founder of the 
Troy Laundry, Troy Dry Cleaning and Troy Towel 
firms in Fort Wayne, and associated with other 
business firms, and banking institutions. He was 
one of the organizers of Lincoln National Life Insur- 
ance Company, a director and member of its 
executive committee. 

Born In Grant County, Ind., he moved here with his 
parents in 1863. His father, David F., established 
the Fort Wayne Gazette which later merged with The 
Journal. Fremont Jones attended local public 
schools and Methodist College. He and Ogden 
Pierce, Sr., established the first steam laundry here. 

Mr. Jones was chairman of Wayne Street Methodist 
Church board. 



DEVOTED CAREER 
TO SOCIAL WORK 

Miss Margaret Ann Keegan (1903-1966) was long 
active in the civic, cultural, religious and social life 
of Fort Wayne. She devoted her entire adult life to 
community service. One of her most successful 
ventures wasthe founding of the Christmas Bureau. 
She created the Fine Arts Festival; helped to weave 
together the Fine Arts Foundation, bringing to- 
gether the city's cultural groups into one organiza- 
tion which led to the Fine Arts Center. 

Miss Keegan attended Fort Wayne Public Schools, 
and received a bachelor's degree at U. of M., spe- 
cializing In physchiatric social work. She worked at 
Fort Wayne State School, and later in the bureau of 
testing and measurements. Fort Wayne Public 
Schools. 



NOTED PIONEER 
OF FORT WAYNE 

Peter Kiser (1810-1890) was one of Fort Wayne's 
prominent settlers. He was born in Green County, 0 
He came through here in 1822, driving hogs to 
Detroit. He settled here in 1825, and was employed 
by Gen. John Tipton, furnishing meat rations for the 
Indians during treaty negotiations. 

Kiser was a butcher by trade, and operated a meat 
market and general store on Calhoun. He sold 
everything from buttons to grindstones. He could 
neither read nor write, but in place of keeping books 
he made pictures on the wall when customers 
bought on credit. 

He had no fear of the wilderness for he was a giant in 
size and strength. He stood six feet tall and weighed 
300 pounds. He represented Allen County twice in 
the state legislature and was an advocate of good 
public schools. 


1 



DR. ISAAC KNAPP, 
PIONEER DENTIST 

Dr. Isaac Knapp, M.D., D.D.S., (1814-1883), was a Fort 
Wayne pioneer dentist. He came here in 1843, and later 
established a wide dental practice. He became the sec- 
ond president of the Indiana State Dental Association in 
1860, and served again as president In 1866 and 1877. 

The Fort Wayne Isaac Knapp Dental Society was named in 
his memory. Following the Civil War, Dr. Knapp had of- 
fices in the Keystone Building, Calhoun and Columbia. It 
was the first building In the city equipped with running 
water and central heating. 

Dr. Knapp was associated In practice with his son. Dr. Will 
B. Knapp. Dr. Isaac Knapp was graduated by Columbia 
Medical College, New York. 



FORMER ALLIED 
SEED OFFICIAL 

Max Kraus (1866-1943) was vice president of Al- 
lied Seed Company and prominent in Fort Wayne 
business, civic and club activities. He served as an 
officer of Allied Seed from its organization in 1932 
until 1943. Previously, he was secretary-treasurer 
of Kraus & Apfelbaum, wholesale grain and seed 
dealers, and president of D. S. Sears, packers of 
condiments. 

He was an active member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce and Rotary Club. He was born and reared in 
Columbia City, and worked with his father, Leopold 
Kraus, a rural produce buyer. 



FOUNDED KUNKLE 
VALVE COMPANY 

Erastus B. Kunkle, (1836-1913) machinist and in- 
ventor, was founder of the Kunkle Valve Company, 
Inc., In 1875. His Inventiveness led to the develop- 
ment of the Kunkle lock-up safety valve and to the 
expansive production of valves. He was also 
credited with the invention of other related pro- 
ducts produced by his firm. 

The Kunkle Valve Company has been in con- 
tinuous operation since Its founding, and its 
modern plant facilities are now located at 8222 
Bluffton Road. Born in West Moreland County, Pa., 
Mr. Kunkle came here in 1864, where he worked in 
the Pennsylvania Railroad shops until he opened 
his valve plant. 



CHESTER T. LANE 
LEADING EDUCATOR 


Chester T. Lane, (1851-1917) principal of old Fort 
Wayne High School for 36 years, was recognized as 
a great scholar, administrator, teacher, and leader 
of youth. 

In recognition of his many accomplishments. Lane 
Junior High School was dedicated to his memory. 
He graduated at Michigan U., in 1874; became 
principal at Ypsilanti High School, and in 1879, 
accepted the principalship here. Mr. Lane had a 
unique and superb faculty which gave Fort Wayne 
High School a reputation of classical excellence. 



TEACHER, CIVIL 
WAR PRISONER 

Henry Lankenau (1843-1910) came to Fort Wayne 
with his parents from Bremen, Germany, in 1844. 
He was educated here, and at age 19, enlisted in 
1862, in the Union Army with Co. "D" of the 5th 
Indiana Cavalry. He was captured by the Con- 
federates in the siege of Atlanta and taken to the 
notorious Andersonville prison. In 1898, he wrote 
about the prison, and battle experiences. 

Following the war he returned to Fort Wayne to work 
as a printer, and deputy county sheriff. He left here 
in 1885, and subsequently taught school in Van 
Wert, 0., St. John's Lutheran School, Bingen, and at 
Zion Lutheran School, Decatur. 



ROSS LOCKRIDGE, 
NOTED HISTORIAN 

Ross F. Lockridge, Sr., (1877-1952) was one of 
Indiana's best-known historians, authors, lecturers 
and educators. He was the founder and director of 
the Hoosier Historical Institute, a "History on 
Wheels." He traveled throughout the state with a 
cast of actors to present the story of Hoosier his- 
torical events on actual location of events. 

Mr. Lockridge was formerly head of the Indiana Uni- 
versity public speaking department, and lectured at 
the I.U. Extension Division in Fort Wayne. He was 
author of "The Story of Indiana," a history book 
adopted by the state for use in the eighth grade. 



PIONEER BUILDER, 
MAYOR IN 1843-44 

Henry Lotz, (1797-1845) prominent pioneer canal 
builder, became Fort Wayne's third mayor in 1843. 
He was re-elected the following year. Lotz resigned 
as mayor after serving sixteen months because his 
private business frequently kept him away from the 
city. 

He was genera! contractor for the first canal aque- 
duct to span the St. Mary's River. It was located on 
the site between the old Nickel Plate Railroad 
bridges, near the Main Street bridge. 

One of the unique ordinances passed by city coun- 
cil, when Lotz was mayor, called for a “penalty for 
riding or driving any horse faster than an ordinary 
gait of travel, except when going for a physician." 





ATTORNEY; LED 
IN CIVIC WORK 

Martin H. Luecke (1883-1948) was one of Fort 
Wayne's prominent attorneys, civic leader, and 
president of the Irene Byron Sanatorium for 29 
years. He was legal adviser for the Lutheran Hos- 
pital and for Fort Wayne Lutheran Churches. 

He was one of the leaders of the Lutheran move- 
ment in the acquisition of Valparaiso University, 
and became a trustee and general counsel for the 
university. 

Mr. Luecke began law practice here in 1903, and 
was first associated with the law firm of Barrett and 
Morris. He was one of the founders of the Chamber 
of Commerce, and in 1915, became the first pres- 
ident of the Fort Wayne Rotary Club. 



HRST ICE CREAM 
SOLD BY MAIER 

John G. Maier (1810-1880) came to Fort Wayne in 1845 
from Circleville, Ohio, and for a number of years operated 
the Maier Grocery on Columbia Street. He was Fort Wayne 
postmaster from 1852 to 1860, and also served as town- 
ship trustee. 

Maier raised and distributed the first strawberries in Allen 
County and introduced here the first musical instru- 
ments and toys. He was the first to sell Ice cream in Fort 
Wayne, and the first to press grape wine for commercial 
purposes. Maler's wine was used for some years in the 
sacrament of communion at Trinity English Lutheran 
Church. 

Mr. Maier died July 4, 1880. Funeral services were con- 
ducted at the family homestead, 78 South Lafayette, by 
Rev. Samuel Wagenhals. 




LOCAL BANKER, 
CIVIC LEADER 

J. Ross McCulloch, (1869-1957) Fort Wayne native, 
was for many years a prominent banker and civic 
leader. He began his career with the old Hamilton 
National Bank, and later served as vice-president of 
the First National Bank, and First & Tri-State 
National Bank. 

He was the son of Charles McCulloch, local banker, 
and grandson of Hugh M. McCulloch, Fort Wayne 
pioneer businessman, banker, first U.S. Comptrol- 
ler of the Currency, and Treasury Secretary under 
Presidents Lincoln, Johnson and Arthur. 

Ross McCulloch was born in the former Hugh 
McCulloch homestead, 616 West Superior. He was 
past president of the Chamber of Commerce, active 
in aviation, the Turners and musical organizations. 



PIONEERED FIRST 
ELECTRIC PLANTS 

Ronald T. McDonald (1849-1898) before the turn 
of the century was one of Fort Wayne's most suc- 
cessful pioneers in the electric light industry. His 
management of the Fort Wayne Jenney Light Com- 
pany and its successor firms, in manufacturing of 
arch light equipment, eventually led to the estab- 
lishment of the local G.E. works. 

Born in Pennsylvania, he came here in 1860. Be- 
fore reaching age 15, he joined the Union Army 
in 1864, as a drummer boy, serving with Company 
C, 152nd Indiana Infantry. After the close of the 
war, he returned here becoming a dry goods clerk. 
Later he met James and Charles Jenney, who had 
perfected a dynamo and arch lighting system. 
They pooled their engineering and promotional 
knowledge, launching the first electric light busi- 
ness in Fort Wayne. 



MERCHANT, BANKER 
AND CIVIC LEADER 

Oliver P. Morgan (1824-1900) native of Lawrence- 
burg, Ind., came to Fort Wayne in 1832. He be- 
came one of Fort Wayne's leading wholesale and 
retail merchants; bankers; city recorder; and city 
treasurer. One of his first jobs was with the Wa- 
bash and Erie Canal as collector of tolls in Fort 
Wayne. 

Mr. Morgan's outstanding civic contribution was 
as city school trustee from 1861 to 1894. It was 
in these years that the public schools merged from 
one to sixteen school houses with 200 teachers. 

Mr. Morgan was vice president of the Old National 
Bank and president of the Fort Wayne Drug Com- 
pany. He was also one of the incorporators of Lin- 
denwood Cemetery and served as its second presi- 
dent from 1891 to 1900. 



LEADING INDIANA 
JUDGE, ATTORNEY 

Judge John Morris (1816-1905) was one of In- 
diana’s leading jurists before the turn of the cen- 
tury. He began practicing at Auburn in 1844, and in 
1852, became judge of DeKalb and Steuben Coun- 
ties. 

He came here in 1857, joining the firm of Case, 
Morris, Withers. Later he was associated in law 
practice with other well known attorneys: James L. 
Worden, Charles H. Aldrich, James M. Barrett, 
Edward J. Woodworth. He served as Indiana 
Supreme Court Commissioner, 1881 to 1883. 

When he took his bar examination in Ohio in 1840, 
one of the examiners was Edwin M. Stanton, who 
became a member of Lincoln’s cabinet. 


f. 



"ANGEL IN EBONY" 

DIED HERE IN 1893 

Sammy Morris, born in 1873, the prince of Kroo 
tribe deep in Liberia, died in Fort Wayne, May 12, 
1893, following a year's study here at Taylor Uni- 
versity. He became known as a famous Christian 
mystic and "Apostle of Simple Faith". 

During his student days, Sammy joined the old 
Berry Street Methodist Church, and assisted In 
services there and at the African Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. 

Taylor University named a dormitory in his mem- 
ory and remembers him as "The Angel in Ebony". 
Taylor seniors of 1928 erected a memorial in Sec- 
tion "14" in Lindenwood that gives permanent 
identity to his resting place. 





NOTED COUNTY 
TRIAL LAWYER 

Samuel L Morris (1849-1922) was one of 1 ndiana’s 
outstanding trial lawyers before and aftertheturn of 
the century. He was graduated by Fort Wayne High 
School In 1869, and was valedictorian of his class. 
Following graduation at Princeton in 1873, he 
studied law under the guidance of his father, Judge 
John Morris, one of the state's leading jurists. 

Mr. Morris participated in much of the important 
litigation in the courts of Allen and surrounding 
counties. As a trial lawyer, “in his pleadings, he was 
painstaking, concise; in argument his most pro- 
minent characteristics were simplicity and force- 
fulness", according to the Allen County Bar. 



EARLY PROMINENT 
CITY POLITICIAN 

Samuel S. Morss (1811-1862) was one of Fort 
Wayne's early prominent politicians. He became 
the city’s first town marshal in 1840, following the 
incorporation of the city. He was elected county 
auditor in 1842, county assessor in 1853, and 
became the city's ninth mayor in 1857. He was re- 
elected mayor in 1858. 

Morss, in 1839, was a member of the first fire 
company known as the famous “Anthony Waynes." 
And the first station house was located at Main and 
Clinton. The fire equipment included a Jeffries 
“gallery" engine, a two-wheel cart, fitted with 500 
feet of riveted leather hose. 

Morss' wife, the former Susan Clark, taught the first 
private school here in 1836, in a remodeled tin shop 
on Columbia St 




PLAYED ROLE IN 
CITY DEVELOPMENT 

B. Paul Mossman (1870-1960) became a promi- 
nent Fort Wayne industrialist, businessman, and 
civic leader after the turn of the century. Following 
graduation at University of Michigan in 1891, he 
became associated with Mossman-Yarnelle Co., 
wholesale hardware distributors. 

Mr. Mossman was president of Mossman-Yarnelle, 
member of the board of directors of First National 
Bank, S. F. Bowser & Co., Fort Wayne Rolling 
Mills, and Lincoln National Life. He was also a 
trustee of Lindenwood Cemetery, and a Thirty- 
Third Degree Scottish Rite Mason. 





DIRECTED GAS CO. 
AFFAIRS 27 YEARS 

Samuel E. Mulholland (1866-1942) was for many years 
one of Fort Wayne's leading utility executives. He came 
here from Logansport in 1908, as assistant general 
manager of the Indiana Lighting Company, now known as 
the Gas Company. 

Mr. Mulholland became vice-president and general 
manager of the Northern Indiana Public Service Com- 
pany when the Northern Indiana Gasand Electric Co. and 
the Indiana Lighting Co. merged in 1916. He remained 
head of the Gas Company until retirement in 1935. 



FOUNDED CHILD 
AIDS COMPANY 

Miss Gertrude A. Muller (1887-1954) was one of 
Fort Wayne’s most successful business women. In 
1924, in cooperation with her sisters, Mrs. Edward 
Cox and Mary K. Muller, she founded the Toidey, 
Co., then known as Juvenile Wood Products, Inc. 

As president and general manager of the firm from 
the day of its organization. Miss Muller continued 
throughout her life to originate and market scien- 
tific aids for the safety and comfort of the baby. 
Products of the Toidey, Co., 4320 Ardmore, are still 
sold throughout the world. 

Miss Muller attended Fort Wayne public schools 
and International Business College. She started her 
business career with the former Van Arnam Mfg. 
Co. 




LEADER IN CREATING 
LINDENWOOD CEMETERY 

Isaac D. Nelson (1810-1891) came to Fort Wayne 
in 1836 from Poughkeepskie, N.Y., acquired the 
Fort Wayne Sentinel and soon became a com- 
munity leader. In 1851, he was elected state rep- 
resentative and authored the famous Nelson rail- 
road act. He was a Purdue University trustee, 
State House Commissioner and aided in organiz- 
ing the Wabash railroad. 

He was one of 12 incorporators of Lindenwood 
Cemetery and its first president, serving from 1860 
to 1891. He married Elizabeth Rockhill, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. William Rockhill, pioneer Fort 
Wayne residents. Their son, William Rockhill Nel- 
son, was founder of the Kansas City Star. 

Isaac Nelson rests in Lindenwood where cemetery 
trustees erected an imposing monument to his 
memory. 



ORIGINATED CITY 
PLAN COMMISSION 

Lee J. Ninde, (1874-1953) Fort Wayne native, was 
prominent in business here and achieved national 
renown in real estate and city planning. He was one 
of the organizers of the Fort Wayne Board of Real- 
tors as well as the Indiana Real Estate Association. 
In 1915 he was vice president of the National Asso- 
ciation of Real Estate Boards. 

He became widely known as the “dean of city plann- 
ing” in Indiana, and was the first chairman of the 
Fort Wayne City Planning Commission established 
in 1916. 

Mr. Ninde was active in promoting some of the city's 
outstanding subdivisions including Lafayette Place 
and Wildwood Park. 




JUSTICE OF PEACE 
DURING EARLY ERA 

Smallwood Noel, (1785-1862) native of Virginia 
settled here in 1824, and became one of the 
community's prominent pioneers. He was justice of 
the peace and became known as “Squire" Noei. He 
was appointed Fort Wayne Postmaster in 1841, 
succeeding Henry W. Rudisill. 

Mr. Noel taught school in the first one-story brick 
school house here. He was one of the founders of 
the First Presbyterian Church. His wife was Sophia 
C. Ewing, daughter of Col. Alexander Ewing, one of 
Fort Wayne's early pioneers. A son, S.V.B. Noel, was 
co-founder of the Fort Wayne Sentinel. 

Mr. Noel, in 1861, led In organizing the local loyalty 
front for the “Union" as the South began its drive for 
“secession." 






EARLY FOUNDER 
OF LOCAL BANKS 

Joseph D. Nuttman (1816-1890) was engaged foi 
a half century in the commercial business of Fort 
Wayne. Born In Elizabeth, N.J., he began his busi- 
ness career at age sixteen, In a New York mercan- 
tile house and later opened stores in Fort Wayne 
and Decatur. 

In 1861, he sold his mercantile business to start 
a private bank here. Following enactment of the 
national banking laws, Mr. Nuttman and Samuel 
Hanna, founded the First National Bank of Fort 
Wayne. It was the first national bank chartered in 
Indiana. The bank with Mr. Nuttman as president 
prospered and grew. In 1882, Mr. Nuttman sold his 
bank stock and organized the private bank of Nutt- 
man & Co. 


FOUNDED INDIANA 
ENGINEERING CO. 

Harry C. Offutt, Sr., (1882-1957), was a founder and 
president of the Indiana Engineering and Con- 
struction Co., Inc. He organized the firm in 1910, 
and pioneered the use of reinforced concrete and 
built the first building with it in Fort Wayne: the for- 
mer Pettit Storage Warehouse. 

Among other structures built by Mr. Offutt were the 
YMCA, Irene Byron Hospital, South Side High 
School, Wayne Knitting Mills, many factories, 
bridges and churches. 

He was graduated by Penn State College in civil 
engineering. He worked for several years as as- 
sistant division engineer for the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road before organizing his own firm. 






FOUNDED OLDS 
WAGON WORKS 

Henry G. Olds (1839-1902) was prominently iden- 
tified with manufacturing interests in Fort Wayne 
before the turn of the century. Born in Auburn, N.Y., 
he moved here with his parents in 1861. His father, 
Noble G. Olds, carpenter and machinist, estab- 
lished a lumber yard, machine works, and built 
wagon wheels. 

Henry Olds in 1881, founded the famous Olds 
Wagon Works, building wagons for farmers, freight 
lines, lumber and cotton mills. The firm was known 
nation wide and became one of the city’s largest 
employers of its timo. 

The Henry Olds home, at Berry Ewing, now houses 
the Mizpah Shrine Temple. 



FIRST WEATHER 
BUREAU OBSERVER 

Walters. Palmer (1866-1915) opened Fort Wayne's 
first official U.S. Weather Station, May 3, 1911, In 
the Gettle (Shoaff) Building at Calhoun and Berry. 
He remained head of the local bureau until his 
death. 

Mr. Palmer was transferred here from the Cheyenne 
weather station. He entered the U.S. Weather 
Service In Chicago, in 1895. He was graduated by 
Michigan Agricultural College, and attended Un- 
iversity of Michigan. Before entering the weather 
service he taught school at Ypsilanti, Muskegon, 
and Spokane, Wash. 



LEADING BANKER 
AND INDUSTRIALIST 

Henry C. Paul (1851-1933) native of Fort Wayne, 
was a leading industrialist and banker here for 
nearly a half century and was credited with hav- 
ing, organized and developed some of the city's 
principal manufacturing plants. 

He was chairman of the board of the former Old- 
First National Bank & Trust Company, and presi- 
dent of the Old National Bank for twenty-five years. 
He was also an organizer and official of public 
utility firms including traction lines, gas, telephone 
and telegraph services. 

Mr. Paul was president of the Fort Wayne Electric 
Works of the General Electric Company from 1899 
to 1905. He helped in organizing the Fort Wayne 
Drug Company and the Fort Wayne Corrugated 
Paper Company. 



ACTIVE DIRECTOR 
IN MUSIC CIRCLES 

Mrs. Isabelle McClure Peltier (1881-1961) was a 
former leader in Fort Wayne’s Morning Musical, 
Community Concerts Association, and served on 
the boards of the Civic Symphony and Philhar- 
monic Orchestra. And for many years she was 
active in many phases of social and civic life in Fort 
Wayne. 

Mrs. Peltier was a gifted artist and for a time taught 
piano. She was a dynamic leader and helped to 
bring some of the finest concert artists to Fort 
Wayne. She was a graduate of Westminster 
Seminary and European School of Music. 

Mrs. Peltier’s estate provided large gifts for Fort 
Wayne Fine Arts, First Presbyterian and T rinity Epis- 
copal Churches. 



FUNERAL DIRECTOR 
AND CIVIC LEADER 

William H.W. Peltier (1869-1941) was a member of Fort 
Wayne’s oldest family and for many years a prominent 
funeral director. His great grandmother, Angeline 
Chapoton, was the first white woman to settle permanent- 
ly in Fort Wayne. His grandfather, Louis Peltier, was the 
first white child born in the old fort. 

For over 25 years, Mr. Peltier was proprietor of the Peltier 
Funeral Home, established by his grandfather in 1832. 
He relinquished his holdings in the mortuary in 1938. 



FOUNDED PERFECT 

WHOLESALE 

GROCERS 

Arthur H. Perfect (1865-1946) was president and co- 
founder of the old A.H. Perfect & Co., wholesale grocers in 
Fort Wayne. A native of Delaware County, 0., he came 
here in 1896, and with his brothers Harry A. Perfect, T. 
Guy Perfect and Henry H. Eavey, purchased the Mc- 
Donald & Watt Wholesale Grocery Co., reorganizing it into 
the A.H. Perfect & Co.. 

He helped in the development of the YMCA and YWCA, 
and was a Lincoln National Bank director and a member 
of the bank’s executive committee. 



FOUNDED FORMER 
PETTIT WAREHOUSE 

William L Pettit, Jr., (1874-1929) native of Fort 
Wayne, was the founder of the former Pettit 
Transfer and Storage Company. The Pettit ware- 
house was housed in a six-story reinforced con- 
crete building at 414 East Columbia, 
it was built in 1909, and remained a prominent 
landmark until the firm was relocated in Industrial 
Park to make way for part of The Three Rivers Rede- 
velopment project. 

Mr. Pettit was a graduate of Lehigh University. He 
established his warehouse after serving as a sur- 
veyor for the Pennsylvania Railroad. 




PIONEERED IN 
MODERN SURGERY 

Dr. Miles F. Porter, Sr., (1856-1933) practiced 
here for 54 years and became a nationally known 
surgeon, pioneering in the advancement of modern 
surgery. 

After 1900, he confined his practice exclusively to 
surgery and obstetrics. As chief of the old Hope 
Hospital medical staff. Dr. Porter built the first 
operating room on the hospital grounds, site of 
downtown Y.M.C.A. He is known to have per- 
formed the first gallbladder operation in the Middle 
West and to have performed one of the first ap- 
pendectomies in the history of surgery. 

He was one of the original organizers of Indiana 
University Medical School, served for a time on its 
faculty, and was one of the founders of the Ameri- 
can College of Surgeons. 



1 

I 



SERVED 5 TERMS 
AS CITY'S MAYOR 

Franklin P. Randall (1812-1892) was known as 
Fort Wayne's "Civil War" mayor. Elected in 
1859, he served five successive terms with dis- 
tinction and honor. 

Fie was educated in eastern academies and came 
here in 1838 to practice law. From time to time 
he held other governmental offices: County school 
commissioner, director of the State prison South, 
city recorder, city attorney and State senator. 
Fie was author of the city charter and designer of 
the city seal. 

Mr. Randall played an active role in the develop- 
ment and building of railroads in this area. In the 
latter part of his career he conducted a successful 
legal, real estate and insurance business. 



PERRY A. RANDALL 
HONORED BY CITY 

Perry A. Randall, (1847-1916) in a span of 43 
years, became a successful Fort Wayne attorney, 
home-builder, manufacturer and leader in com- 
munity development. Shortly after his death. Fort 
Wayne citizens erected in East Swinney Park a 
bronze portrait bust of Mr. Randall, commemorat- 
ing his many civic achievements. 

He began practicing law here in 1 867, and in 1 881 , 
became a partner with William J. Vesey and their 
legal firm became most successful. Mr. Randall 
also owned and operated the city's first home 
building company, the Tri-State Building & Loan 
Co. He also owned and operated the old Randall 
Hotel, and had extensive holdings in wholesale 
lumber firms. 



MANUFACTURER 
FOR MANY YEARS 

William C. Rastetter, Sr., (1874-1940) was presi- 
dent of the old Louis Rastetter & Sons, Inc., furni- 
ture manufacturers, and prominent in Fort Wayne 
civic affairs. He was a member and former presi- 
dent of the Fort Wayne Public School Board. 

Born in Fort Wayne, Mr. Rastetter attended public 
grade and high schools here. He played on the first 
football team organized in the schools in 1890. He 
entered the furniture business with his father as a 
young man. 

Mr. Rastetter was president of the Quest Club; 
Rotary Club director; exalted ruler of the Elks; mem- 
ber of Third Presbyterian church; affiliated with 
Scottish Rite and Mizpah Temple. 




FOUNDED REA 
MAGNET WIRE CO. 

Victor F. Rea (1889-1959) was a prominent Fort 
Wayne industrialist and civic leader. He was presi- 
dent of Rea Magnet Wire Co., which he founded in 
1933. He came here in 1910 to become general 
manager of the old Dudio Co., which was merged 
with General Cable Co., in 1927. 

Mr. Rea was a member of Plymouth Congregational 
church and trustee of that church; president of the 
YMCA for six years; trustee of the Associated Col- 
leges of Indiana, and assisted in fund raising cam- 
paigns for Parkview Memorial and Lutheran Hos- 
pitals, and United Fund. 




BESSIE ROBERTS, 
NOTED HISTORIAN 

Mrs. Bessie Keeran Roberts (1886-1964) was a 
prominent Fort Wayne historian, journalist and 
school teacher. She was author of “Fort Wayne's Al- 
bum", “The Glorious Gate", “A Wayne Scrapbook", 
and an unpublished history of Abraham Lincoln's 
days In Indiana entitled, “The Frontier Line". 

Mrs. Roberts was a reporter for the Evansville 
Courier and later society editor for The Fort Wayne 
Journal-Gazette. She was graduated by Fort Wayne 
High School and Indiana University. She also taught 
In Fort Wayne Public Schools. 

Mrs. Roberts was the wife of the late Frank Roberts, 
former editor of The Journal-Gazette. 





CIVIL WAR HERO, 
LAWYER, HISTORIAN 

Col, Robert S. Robertson (1839-1906) during the 
last half of the 19th century became a successful 
lawyer, politician and historian in Fort Wayne. He 
was born and educated in North Argyle, N.Y. 

In 1861, he joined the Union Army, serving 
throughout most of the Civil War, advancing from 
private to colonel. He became a staff officer be- 
fore the Battle of Gettysburg; was wounded in the 
Battle of Spottsylvania Courthouse; participated in 
the siege of Petersburg. He received the Congres- 
sional Medal of Honor for gallantry in action. 

He settled here in 1866, to practice law. Active 
in Republican politics, he served as city attorney 
and then as lieutenant governor of Indiana. 



LEADER IN EARLY 
CITY DEVELOPMENT 

William Rockhill (1793-1865) came here in 1823, 
from Burlington, NJ., and for 42 years was one of 
the leaders in the commercial development and 
political life in Fort Wayne. Soon after his arrival 
he acquired a large tract of land in the Broadway 
area. It was recorded as Rockhill additions. He 
built the historic Rockhill house at Broadway and 
Main, which later became a part of St. Joseph's 
Hospital. 

Rockhill was a member of the first board of county 
commissioners; served two terms as state repre- 
sentative; was one of the pioneers in the estab- 
lishment of the city's public school system; served 
as a member of the first city council. He was a 
state senator in 1844, and in 1846, was elected 
U.S. Congressman. 



CHURCH FOUNDER 
IN FRONTIER DAYS 

Henry W. RudisilL (1801-1858) one of Fort 
Wayne's early pioneers, helped to lay the founda- 
tions of a thriving village. He and his family 
arrived here Christmas Day, 1829, from Lancaster, 
0., and were escorted to their new home by Samuel 
Hanna and Allen Hamilton. 

Rudisill assisted in the work of U. S. land agents, 
John T. Barr and John McCorkle, and later Rudi- 
sill's enterprises included a gristmill, sawmill, tan- 
nery and a woolen mill. He was a deeply religious 
man, directing the founding of St. Paul's Lutheran 
Church as well as Trinity English Lutheran Church. 
The pulpit in Trinity Church is a memorial to 
Henry W. and Elizabeth Rudisill, provided by their 
daughter, Eliza Rudisill, who died in 1929. 





ERECTED MANY 
BUILDINGS HERE 

Fred J. Rump, (1872-1965) was a general building 
contractor here from 1900 until retirement in 1941. 
Among the many buildings he erected were the 
main office of the Lincoln National Life Insurance 
Co., south wing of the Lutheran Hospital, old Wolf & 
Dessauer store. First Church of Christ Scientist, ITT 
building on East Pontiac, and several buildings in 
the G.E. complex. 

Mr. Rump, a native of Germany, came to Fort Wayne 
in 1888. He was a charter member of Emmaus 
Lutheran Church, former chairman of the congre- 
gation, past Lutheran Hospital board member, and 
former Lindenwood Cemetery board member. 



MANAGED RURODE 
STORE 65 YEARS 

Ernst C. Rurode (1838-1925) was founder and president 
of the old Rurode Dry Goods Company and for 65 years 
one of Fort Wayne’s leading merchants. A native of 
Germany, he settled here in 1860, and with John 
McDougal and L.B. Root, opened the New York Store, later 
to become the Rurode store. Mr. Rurode became sole 
owner in 1897. 

He was a member of Trinity English Lutheran Church for 
50 years and assisted in building old Trinity Church at 
Clinton and Wayne. 



FIRST MEDICAL 
SOCIETY LEADER 

Dr. Charles A. Schmitz (1809-1887) began prac- 
ticing medicine here in 1838, when Fort Wayne was 
still a small trading post. He was a successful physi- 
cian and cared for his patients until retiring in 1872. 

During his career he served on the Fort Wayne 
Board of Health, and In 1860 became first presi- 
dent of the Allen County Medical Society. Dr. 
Schmitz was born in Germany, and received his 
medical training at Bonn. Before coming here, he 
practiced in Philadelphia. He married Henriette 
Lans of Fort Wayne, in 1840. She was also a native of 
Germany. 

Dr. And Mrs. Schmitz lived to see Fort Wayne 
emerge from the old fort days to the canal era, and 
to the establishment of railroads and factories. 




MICHIGAN'S GREAT 
ALL-TIME CENTER 

Adolph '‘Germany” Schulz (1884-1951) Fort Wayne 
native, was one of the great all-time University of 
Michigan football players. He attended Fort Wayne 
schools, played high school and sandlot football, 
enrolled at Michigan in 1904, standing 6-foot-2, 
weighing 248, and had the strength of a blacksmith. 
He revolutionized center play at Michigan, 1904- 
1908, being the first pivot man to drop behind the 
line on defense. It was in the era of bone-crushing 
power play. Walter Camp named Schulz greatest 
center in football history. He was chosen All-Ameri- 
can in 1907; placed on Grantland Rice's All-Time 
Team, and in 1951, placed on the Associated Press 
All-Time College Football Team. 



PROMINENT 

LAWYER, 

PUBLIC OFFICIAL 

William H. Shambaugh (18564927) native of Allen 
County, was one of Fort Wayne's distinguished lawyers, 
state representative, and for twelve years Fort Wayne city 
attorney. 

While city attorney, Mr. Shambaugh became so efficient 
in municipal law that he was chosen to write the 1894 Fort 
Wayne Municipal Charter. He served on the Fort Wayne 
School Board from 1910 to 1926. 

Mr. Shambaugh attended Normal School at Lebanon, 0., 
and Valparaiso University, before entering law practice 
here. He was a director and attorney for the Lincoln 
National Bank & Trust Co., and counsel for a number of 
manufacturing firms. 



"BIRD BOY" ART SMITH 
BLAZED PATH TO GLORY 

Arthur R. "Art" Smith: 1890-1926. He is known 
as Fort Wayne's "Bird Boy", originator of sky- 
writing, king of the "loop-the-loop", and one of 
the Nation's early air daredevils. 

Art's career, during which he astounded millions 
at home and in the Orient with his flying skill, 
came to a tragic end on the night of February 12, 
1926. He died when his U.S. Airmail plane fell 
in Ohio — not far from Fort Wayne, where at the 
age of 16 he built his first plane, and later became 
one of America's great pioneer aviators. Smith 
Field, the airport north of the city, was named for 
him. 



ON FIRE FORCE 
FOR 50 YEARS 

JohnC. Stahlhut(1866-1941) wasamemberof Fort 
Wayne’s fire department for 50 years, and fire chief 
from 1925 to 1940. He became a fireman at No. 2 
Station in 1890, and later promoted to captain. He 
was made assistant chief in 1908. 

In point of service. Chief Stahihut had the longest 
record of any city official at the time of his retire- 
ment. The last steam pumper was taken out of ser- 
vice in 1920, and it was then Chief Stahihut's as- 
signment to retire the department's last team of 
horses. 

He was widely known for his fire fighting ability and 
constant attention to up-dating fire equipment. 



EARLY MERCHANT 
IN FORT WAYNE 

Nathaniel P. Stockridjge, (1820-1896) native of Freeport, 
Maine, settled here with his young wife in 1843, and later 
became one of the community’s prominent merchants. 
From 1843 to 1853, he managed the large H. Durrie & Co. 
hardware store, later to become the successful Morgan & 
Beach store. Then Mr. Stockbridge acquired the D. W. 
Burroughs store, a book and stationery outlet, the first es- 
tablishment of its kind in Fort Wayne. His store for 38 
years provided books and stationery materials for a grow- 
ing town. He was a student of good music and literature. 

Mr. Stockbridge was city treasurer In 1848-1849. His re- 
sidence at 225 West Wayne Street was for many years a 
Fort Wayne landmark. 




PIONEER DOCTOR 
IN FORT WAYNE 

Dr. Charles E. Sturgis (1815-1869) was one of Fort 
Wayne’s successful pioneer doctors. He was born 
and reared in Queen Anne County, Md. After gra- 
duation at Ohio Medical College he resided for a 
short time in Richmond, Ind., and Logansport, 
before coming to Fort Wayne where he practiced 
medicine for 30 years. 

He represented Allen County in both houses of the 
Indiana legislature, and for many years was presi- 
dent of the Fort Wayne School Board. In 1868, Dr. 
Sturgis was a delegate to the Democratic National 
Convention in New York that nominated Horatio 
Seymour for president. 

Dr. Sturgis was married to Lavina Ewing, daughter 
of Col. and Mrs. Alexander Ewing, early Fort Wayne 
settlers. 



LIVED IN FIRST 
LOG HOUSE HERE 

Mrs. Laura Suttenfield (1795-1886) was born in 
Boston, and at age 16, becamethewifeof a dashing 
young army officer. Col William Suttenfield. They 
were married in Detroit, and in 1814 settled in Fort 
Wayne. For a while, they lived Inside the fort, and 
were the first to erect a log house here and it stood 
near Columbia and Barr. Mrs. Suttenfield was the 
first white woman to make Fort Wayne her perma- 
nent home. 

Mrs. Suttenfield's sister, Eliza Taylor, became the 
wife of Samuel Hanna, prominent Fort Wayne 
pioneer. The Suttenflelds helped found the First 
Presbyterian Church, and the colonel assisted in 
the incorporation of the Village of Fort Wayne In 
1829. 

Mrs. Suttenfield lived to be 91, and many of her rare 
recollections of early Fort Wayne have been 
preserved. 






SWINNEYS LEAVE 
TWO MEMORIALS 

Col. Thomas W. Swinney (1803-1875) was one of 
Fort Wayne's early settlers. Arriving here in 1822, 
from Piketon, Ohio, he found a small settlement 
surrounding the old fort. His successful career 
began a year later when he made his initial pur- 
chase of government land west of town. As his 
land holdings increased, he became prominent in 
farming, and widely interested in political affairs 
of Fort Wayne, state and nation. 

He married Lucy Taber here in 1827, daughter 
of Capt. Paul Taber, also a prosperous land owner. 
Col. Swinney and his wife built the Swinney home- 
stead in 1844, and today it houses the priceless 
collections of the Allen County-Fort Wayne His- 
torical Society. 



Herman W. Tapp (1857-1928) was for many years a 
prominent construction contractor. His large con- 
tracts included the construction of the West Main 
Street bridge, State Street boulevard bridge, 
Coombs Street bridge, and track elevation work for 
the Pennsylvania, Wabash and New York Central 
railroads. 

Mr. Tapp was born in Germany, but came here 
when a small child. The Tapp residence was loca- 
ted at the northeast corner of Hanna and Lewis, now 
occupied by American Legion Post 148. 


BUILT BRIDGES, 
RR aEVATIONS 




INTERNATIONALLY 
KNOWN GEOLOGIST 

Frank B. Taylor (1860-1938) was an internationally 
known geologist. A graduate of Fort Wayne High 
School, he attended Harvard, where he studied 
geology, mineralogy, chemistry, meterology. He 
became a noted geologist and author of 70 articles 
on the glacial period, mainly in the region of the 
Great Lakes, the Niagara River, southwestern On- 
tario and western New England. 

He was recognized world-wide for his history of the 
Niagara, the falls and the gorge. As a result of his 
scientific studies and discoveries, he was given 
honors by several geological societies. 

Mr. Taylor was active In the Fort Wayne Historical 
Society, Fortnightly Club, and Fort Wayne Art School 
and Museum. 




FOUNDED WAYNE 
KNITTING MILLS 

Theodore F. Thieme ( 1 857-1949) was one of Fort Wayne’s 
early prominent manufacturers. He was founder of the 
old Wayne Knitting Mills and of the full-fashioned hosiery 
industry in America. A native of Fort Wayne, he attended 
Concordia College and College of Pharmacy in New York. 

He was engaged in the drug store business here for a 
short time before opening Wayne Knitting Mills in 1891. 
Mr. Thieme with his own funds beautified West Main 
parkway from Main Street bridge to Swinney Park. This 
was later named Thieme Drive in his honor. 

The Thiemes donated large sums for cultural projects 
and gave their home at 1026 West Berry for founding of 
the Fort Wayne Art School and Museum. 



FOUNDER IN 1833 
OF THE SENTINEL 

Thomas Tigar (1807-1875) was co-founder of The 
Fort Wayne Sentinel in 1833, and first local news- 
paper editor. For 32 years he recorded events of the 
frontier village and its expansion. 

He was born in London where he learned a printer’s 
trade. Coming to America, he followed his trade. 
While at The Indianapolis Journal he met S.V.B. 
Noel, also a printer. They were encouraged to start 
The Sentinel here by Samuel Hanna and Jesse L. 
Williams. The Sentinel prospered, merging with The 
News in 1918. 

Tigar has been referred to as "the best editorial 
writer ever to come to Indiana." 



FORMER OPERATOR 
OF TRIER’S PARK 

George F. Trier (1876-1942) was a prominent dancing in- 
structor and operator of old Trier's Park and amusement 
center in West Swinney Park until 1940. Born here, Mr. 
Trier attended the Lutheran parochial schools and Inter- 
national College. At age 18 he became a stenographer in 
the law firm of the late James B. Harper. 

Later he became secretary and general manager of the 
National Telephone Company with headquarters here, 
and then held the same position with the Delaware and 
Madison County Telephone Company. Mr. Trier operated 
the Mulqueen Dancing Academy at Calhoun and Wash- 
ington, and later headed the dancing academy In the old 
Minuet Building. He also leased and operated a dancing 
pavilion in 1905 at Robison Park. 

His success at Robison Park led to his venture in West 
Swinney Park where he presented a variety of outdoor 
amusements for picnics and celebrations. 





FORMER BUSINESS 
COLLEGE HEAD 

J. LyleTucker, Sr., (1885-1950) was president of In- 
ternational Business College from 1929 to 1950. A 
native of Orono, Ontario, Canada, he came here with 
his parents in 1893 and was graduated by Interna- 
tional College in 1901. 

After graduation he worked for the old White Na- 
tional Bank and in 1911, he became bookkeeper for 
International College, and In 1920 he was named 
treasurer. He was a Rotarian, Scottish Rite Mason, 
and member of Mizpah Shrine, Plymouth Congre- 
gational Church and Orchard Ridge Country Club. 




illpiffi! 


-««»SSS?5SI|s»Si 

: liiSlifeli? 


PIONEER BUILDER 
OF PLANK ROADS 

Jesse E. Vermilyea (1809-1846) came to Fort 
Wayne in the early 1820’s from Duchess County, 
N.Y., to farm and trade with the Indians, and later 
became a successful building contractor. 

He was one of the original directors of the Fort 
Wayne Branch Bank, and contractor on the Wabash 
and Erie Canal. He worked with Samuel Hanna in 
building the Lima Plank Road for a distance of 50 
miles. 

He also built his famous Vermilyea Mansion in 
1839, on his farm near the Village of Aboite. Mr. 
Vermilyea also served as Aboite postmaster for 
many years. 




ATTORNEY, JUDGE 
AND CIVIC LEADER 

Judge William J. Vesey (1857-1940) was a promi- 
nent attorney, jurist and civic leader here for more 
than 60 years. Born and educated in Lagrange 
county, he taught school briefly, studied law, and 
was admitted to the Indiana bar in 1878. 

He entered the law firm of Ninde and Ellison, and 
then at different times practiced law with Perry A. 
Randall, Owen Heaton, Allen J. Vesey and Fred J. 
Shoaff. He was judge of Allen Superior Court in 
1899-1900. He was attorney for a number of banks 
and industries, and an early leader of the Chamber 
of Commerce. 



PASTOR AT TRINITY 
FOR HALF CENTURY 

Rev. Samuel Wagenhals, D.D., (1843-1920) served 
as pastor of Trinity English Lutheran Church here 
from 1868 to 1920 — an unparalled record of 
Christian service to the church and community. 
Born in Lancaster, 0., he was educated at Capitol 
University, Columbus, 0., and Theological Semi- 
nary, Philadelphia. 

Enlisting as a private and becoming a lieutenant, 
Wagenhals served with the Union Army throughout 
the Civil War. After the war he completed his 
seminary education, and became pastor of Trinity, 
June 10, 1868. The church had a membership 
then of 92. His long pastorate was one of con- 
tinued progress and congregational growth. 

Rev. Wagenhals was one of the founders of Chi- 
cago Lutheran Theological Seminary. 



WARD SCHOOL 
NAMED FOR HIM 

Louis C. Ward (1878-1931) was one of Fort 
Wayne's outstanding school administrators. He 
became instructor at Central High in 1907, its prin- 
cipal, 1915, superintendent of schools, 1920 to 
1931. Under his dynamic leadership, new schools 
were erected, and the system climbed scholastical- 
ly, ranking with the best in the Nation. 

Mr. Ward is buried in Lindenwood as are other 
noted Hoosier educators including Margaret M. 
MacPhail, John S. Irwin, and Chester T. Lane. 





SOLDIER, EMINENT 
MERCHANT, BANKER 

James B. White, (1835-1897) wealthy Fort Wayne 
merchant, Civil War veteran, congressman and 
banker, settled here in 1854. He came from Scot- 
land. The last leg of his journey was by packet 
boat over the Wabash-Erie Canal from Toledo. 

He began work as a tailor with Nirdlinger and Op- 
penheimer's clothing store. He married Maria 
Brown of Fort Wayne, and in 1 859, opened his own 
tailoring shop. In 1861, he sold his prosperous 
business to join the Union Army. Serving as a 
captain, he fought at Pittsburg Landing and was 
wounded at Shiloh. 

After the war. White formed a firm which later be- 
came the successful White Fruit House, a super- 
market of its time. Active in politics, he served 
one term as U. S. Congressman. 



LONG SERVICE 
IN JOURNALISM 

Harry M. Williams (1866-1942) was a widely known 
and highly respected newspaperman in Indiana 
during a long career in journalism. He also served 
as a state senator from Allen County for a four-year 
term, having been elected in 1930. 

He was long indentified with Fort Wayne news- 
papers. He was best remembered as editorial writer 
for the Journal-Gazette, of the Evening Press and 
managing editor of the Evening Sentinel. 

As an editorial writer, Mr. Williams was known for 
his wide knowledge of politics, history and 
literature. His son, the late Park D. Williams, was 
also a prominent Journal-Gazette reporter and 
editor. 



BUILT CANALS 
AND RAILROADS 

Jesse L. Williams (1807-1886) was educated in 
Cincinnati, and at 21, began a highly successful 
civil engineering career, surveying and construct- 
ing canal systems in Ohio and Indiana. In the mid 
1800's he became one of the Nation's foremost 
engineers in building railroads in the Midwest 
and far west. 

He came here as construction engineer for the 
Wabash-Erie Canal. In 1836, he was appointed the 
State's chief engineer of all canal routes in In- 
diana. He served as governor director of the Union 
Pacific Railway under Presidents Lincoln, Johnson 
and Grant. It was Williams who established the 
best location and lowest grade through the Rockies 
for this railroad. 





LED IN FOUNDING 
OLD W&D STORE 

Samuel Wolf, (1868-1960) born and educated 
here, was an outstanding and highly respected 
businessman, financier and former merchant, and 
contributed much to Fort Wayne as a civic leader. 

Mr. Wolf was co-founder with Myron E. Dessauer 
in 1896 of the old Wolf 8t Dessauer store, prede- 
cessor of L. S. Ayres downtown store. He led the 
way in new merchandising methods and W&D 
became an institution in Fort Wayne— a pleasant 
place to shop and dine. He sold his interest in the 
store in the early 1920s and then devoted himself 
to financial and real estate interests. 



SERVED AS NURSE 
IN UNION ARMY 

Mrs. Helena Wolff, (1836-1925) was a well known 
Union Army nurse and one of Fort Wayne's best 
known Civil War personalities. For over two score 
years, she was a familiar figure at all public pa- 
triotic assemblies held in honor of Civil War heroes. 

Mrs. Wolff was assigned to nursing the wounded at 
military hospitals in Cincinnatti, Louisville, and 
Nashville, Tenn. In recognition of her services, she 
was publicly received by President Lincoln and 
Gen. Grant. Gen. Logan gave her a citation for 
bravery in caring for the wounded. 



PUBLISHER SERVED 
AS FIRST MAYOR 

George W. Wood (1808-1871) newspaper pub- 
lisher, politician and businessman, had a promi- 
nent part in the early development of Fort Wayne. 
He came here in 1836, joining The Sentinel as a 
printer and a year later was its publisher. He sold 
The Sentinel in 1840, and became publisher of 
The Fort Wayne Times. 

He was elected Fort Wayne's first mayor in 1840, 
and re-elected in 1841. In 1849, he was appointed 
by President Fillmore to head the Fort Wayne land 
office. In 1855, he sold his newspaper holdings to 
John W. Dawson, and then served as administra- 
tor of the vast Samuel Hanna estate. 



IN G. E. GROWTH 


James J. Wood, ( 1 856-1 928) General Electric con- 
sulting engineer here for 38 years, was one of the 
Nation's foremost inventors. He began his career 
at Branford, Conn., at age 16, inventing a hori- 
zontal steam engine. Later he invented the "Wood" 
electrical system, playing an important role in 
early development of General Electric. 

He held 240 patents, and was credited with de- 
veloping the dynamo for flood lights first used on 
the Statue of Liberty. His picture hangs in the 
Hall of Fame in New York City along with Edison 
and others. 


INVENTIONS AIDED 



DISTINGUISHED 
CIVIC LEADER 

Mrs. Clara Porter Yarnelle (1884-1966) during her 
long and active career was one of Fort Wayne's out- 
standing community leaders. She was president of 
the YWCA, College Club, Visiting Nurses League 
and Washington School PTA. 

Mrs. Yarnelle was also active In the Community 
Concert Association, American Association of Uni- 
versity Women, Fort Wayne Art School, Needlework 
Guild, Fortnightly Club and First Presbyterian 
Church. Her work with mothers of young children 
resulted in formation of several Yarnelle Child 
Study Clubs. She attended Fort Wayne public 
schools and received a B.A. degree at Bryn Mawr. 



LEADER IN HEAVY 
HARDWARE FIRM 

Edward F. Yarnelle, (1850-1938) was one of Fort Wayne's 
outstanding business leaders and philanthropists. He 
came to Fort Wayne in 1878, and his first job was as clerk 
in Foster Bros. Dry Goods Store. Then he joined Coombs & 
Co., wholesale heavy hardware. In 1882, Mr. Yarnelleand 
Frank Alderman purchased the A. D. Brandriff hardware 
firm on East Columbia. 

William E. Mossman bought Mr. Alderman's interest in 
1885 and it became known as Mossman & Yarnelle Com- 
pany. Mr. Yarnelle was president and later chairman of 
the board. He was also associated with other local busi- 
nesses, was active in church, music, and civic affairs. He 
became a Thirty-Third degree Scottish Rite Mason in 
1926. 

He was a member of the City Park Board and donated to 
the park system a tract of land at the Jefferson Street ap- 
proach to Swinney Park. He also gave "Camp Yarnelle" at 
Winona Lake to the YWCA. 




LT. JOHN T. YOUNG 
LAST G.A.R. VETERAN 

Lt. John T. Young (1847-1941) was the last surviving 
member of the G.A.R. in Allen County. He was twice 
commander of Bass-Lawton Post, and a resident of Fort 
Wayne for 65 years. He enlisted in the Union Army in 
March, 1862, with Company D, 118th Infantry in Angola, 
and served with the Army of Tennessee at Cumberland 
Gap, Greenville, Williams Fort, and Strawberry Plains. 

Lt. Young was a railroader during the daysofthe old wood 
burning type locomotives. He also served as engineer at 
the post office. 



DISTINGUISHED 
LAWYER, JUDGE 

Judge Allen Zollars (1839-1909) served with dis- 
tinction as a lawyer, state legislator and judge here 
for nearly a half century. 

He was born In Licking County, 0., and graduated by 
Dennison University and Michigan University Law 
school. He entered law practice here in 1867, and 
was married to Minnie Ewing, formerly of Lan- 
caster, 0. 

Judge Zollars became judge of Allen Superior Court 
upon Its establishment in 1877. He was elected 
State Supreme Court judge in 1882, and later 
returned to Fort Wayne to build a large law practice. 
The Zollars rest In Lindenwood. 



CIVIL WAR HERO, 
SUCCESSFUL MAYOR 

Col. Charles A. Zollinger (1838-1893) Civil War 
hero, former sheriff of Allen County, was elected 
mayor of Fort Wayne in 1873. By re-election every 
two years, he held this office continuously for 
twelve years. Upon retirement from office, he left 
a balance of $133,000, in the city's treasury, and 
a record of impressive municipal accomplishments. 

While in the Union Army, Col. Zollinger fought at 
Murfreesboro, Shiloh, and was with Sherman dur- 
ing the Atlanta campaign. He also took part in the 
battles of Franklin and Nashville, and the last 
conflict of the rebellion at Kinston, N. C. After 
the close of the war, he assisted in organizing the 
tovyn of New Haven and served as first president 
of its board of trustees. 





V 

Entrance 

Administration 

Office 


THE 

LIIMDENWOOD CEMETERY 

FORT WAYNE. INDIANA 


NAME 


LOT NUMBER 


SECTION 


Calvin Anderson 
Francis S. Aveline 
Harry W Baals 
Paul Frank Baer 
Judge Peter B. Bailey 
Myron H Barbour 
Edward A. Barnes 
James Barnett 
James M. Barrett, Sr. 
Solomon Bash 
John H. Bass 
Col. Sion S. Bass 
Minnette Baum 
Solomon D. Bayless 
Henry A. Beadell 
S. B. Bechtel 
Mrs. Jessie Maria Bond 
James W. Borden 
Christian Boseker 
Sylvanus F Bowser 
Joseph Brackenridge 
Cong. Samuel Brenton 
Dr. William H. Brooks 
Judge William W. Carson 
David H. Colerick 
Margaret M. Colerick 
David M. Comparet 
Louis F Curdes 
Frank H. Cutshall 


33 

J 

65 

B 

14 

C 

13 

H 

48 

B 

130 

F 

13 

I (Eye) 

114 

J 

74 

I (Eye) 

124 

J 

1 

E 

81 

J 

39 

Y 

70 

B 

41 

Two 

48 

E 

32 

H 

165 

G 

144 

J 

7 

I (Eye) 

86 

J 

13 

J 

125 

F 

122 

F 

80 

J 

60 

F 

24 

F 

21 

I (Eye) 

68 

West View 


NAME 

LOT NUMBER 

SECTION 

John W Dawson 

54 

B 

Hugh M. Deihl 

138 

F 

John H. Doswell 

8 

I (Eye) 

D. Burns Douglass 

34 

I (Eye) 

John B. DuBois 

29 

E 

Dr. Herman A. Duemling 

76 

I (Eye) 

Fred Eckart 

155 

J 

Alfred R Edgerton 

82 

J 

Joseph K. Edgerton 

109 

J 

Samuel Edsall 

6 

E 

William S. Edsall 

62 

E 

Miss Julia E. Emanuel 

(Cremation) 


Charles W. Ewing 

62 

B 

Col. George W. Ewing 

62 

B 

Capt. Asa Fairfield 

114 

B 

John Ferguson 

48 

G 

Lucien R Ferry 

22 

R 

Robert M. Feustel 

3 

West Terrace 

Oscar G. Foellinger 

90 

A 

Louis Fortriede, Sr. 

65 

R 

Col. David N. Foster 

178 

G 

Samuel M. Foster 

7 

E 

Marx Frank 

127 

Y 

John B. Franke 

59 

I (Eye) 

William Geake 

124 

G 

Mrs. Eliza E. George 

33 

H 

Dr. George W. Gillie 

108 

A 

Capt. John N. Godown 

83 

J 

William F Graeter 

131 

S 


NAME 


LOT NUMBER 


SECTION 


Jesse A. Grice 
William M. Griffin 
Bert J. Griswold 
Herbert J. Grosvenor 
John Earl Groth, Sr. 

Olaf N. Guldlin 
Edward A. K. Hackett 
Arthur E Hall 
Allen Hamilton 
Emerine Jane Hamilton 
Samuel Hanna 
Gottlieb H. Heine 
Louis Heilbroner 
Henry J. Herbst 
Dr. Victor H. Hilgemann 
Pliny Hoagland 
Edward G. Hoffman 
John Hough, Jr. 

Fred S. Hunting 

Dr. Merchant W. Huxford 

Max Irmscher, Sr. 

Samuel D. Jackson 

Fremont L. Jones 

Miss Margaret Ann Keegan 

Peter Kiser 

Dr. Isaac Knapp 

Max Kraus 

Erastus B. Kunkle 

Chester T. Lane 

Henry Lankenau 


4 

N 

118 

A 

34 

1 (Eye) 

99 

N 

1 

West Terrace 

174 

G 

5 

G 

10 

E 

27 

H 

27 

H 

60&61 

B 

27 

N 

163 

Y 

4 

West View 

25 

Terrace View 

29 

H 

53 

1 (Eye) 

28 

H 

19 

I (Eye) 

183 

U 

41 

South Terrace 

93 

A 

103 

G 

83 

B 

95 

J 

40 

D 

105 

Y 

26 

G 

39 

G 

34 

EB.G. 


NAME 


LOT NUMBER 


SECTION 


Ross E Lockridge, Sr. 
Henry Lotz 
Martin H. Luecke 
John G. Maier 
J. Ross McCulloch 
Ronald T. McDonald 
Oliver R Morgan 
Judge John Morris 
Samuel Morris 
Samuel L. Morris 
Samuel S. Morss 
B. Paul Mossman 
Samuel E. Mulholland 
Miss Gertrude A. Muller 
Issac D. Nelson 
Lee J. Ninde 
Smallwood Noel 
Joseph D. Nuttman 
Henry C. Offutt, Sr. 
Henry G. Olds 
Walter S. Palmer 
Henry C. Paul 
Isabelle McClure Peltier 
William H. W. Peltier 
Arthur H. Perfect 
William L. Pettit, Jr. 

Dr. Miles E Porter, Sr. 
Eranklin P Randall 
Perry A. Randall 


163 

K 

23 

H 

20 

G 

113 

E 

59 

B 

6 

D 

25 

H 

12 

D 

1 

Eourteen 

12 

D 

166 

R 

18 

I (Eye) 

9 

K 

9 

G 

35 

H 

88 

J 

91 

B 

84 

J 

18 

Terrace View 

125 

J 

199 

G 

1 

Lake View Plac 

151 

Z 

41 

D 

2 

Lake View Plac 

89 

J 

39 

Ci 

34 

H 

3 

H 


NAME 


LOT NUMBER 


SECTION 


William C. Rastetter, Sr. 

66 

A 

Victor E Rea 

78 

A 

Mrs. Bessie Keeran Roberts 

53 

Z 

Col Robert S. Robertson 

173 

G 

William Rockhill 

5 

F 

Henry W Rudisill 

I 

H 

Fred J. Rump 

3 

A 

Ernest C. Rurode 

65 

B 

Dr. Charles A. Schmitz 

139 

J 

A. “Germany” Schulz 

164 

J 

William H. Shambaugh 

173 

G 

Arthur R. Smith 

43 

K 

John C. Stahlhut 

22 

M 

Nathanial R Stockbridge 

42 

H 

Dr. Charles E. Sturgis 

91 

J 

Laura Suttenfield 

133 

F 

Col. Thomas W. Swinney 

86 

D 

Herman W. Tapp 

38 

D 

Frank B. Taylor 

113 

J 

Theodore F Thieme 

93 

J 

Thomas Tigar 

118 

J 

George F Trier 

34 

G 

J. Lyle Tucker, Sr. 

47 

South Terrace 

Jesse E. Vermilyea 

169 

G 

Judge William J. Vesey 

169 

J 

Rev. Samuel Wagenhals 

99 

G 

Louis C. Ward 

139 

Six 

James B. White 

75 

F 

Harry M. Williams 

118 

P 


NAME 

LOT NUMBER 

SECTION 

Jesse L. Williams 

175 

G 

Samuel Wolf 

109 

Y 

Mrs. Helena Wolff 

77 

P 

George W Wood 

111 

F 

James J. Wood 

47 

I (Eye) 

Mrs. Clara Porter Yarnelle 

(Cremation) 


Edward F Yarnelle 

147 

R 

Lt. John Young 

172 

K 

Allen Zollars 

35 

D 

Col. Charles A. Zollinger 

268 

U 


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